A Posteriori

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A Posteriori

[Latin, From the effect to the cause.]

A posteriori describes a method of reasoning from given, express observations or experiments to reach and formulate general principles from them. This is also called inductive reasoning.

See: analytical, discursive
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, investigators found evidence that most, if not all, business students learned the importance of one of design thinking's cognitive aspects: abductive reasoning, or the generation of ideas.
Unlike the traditional forms of reasoning, abductive reasoning is not linear but lateral; it deals with patterns and relationships and accepts that all knowledge is open to doubt and revision and open to interpretations from different perspectives.
While abductive reasoning can well serve all policy-relevant research, it may be particularly helpful in situations of complexity and diversity (Wolf 2002).
The process of choosing the most reasonable explanation from a field of explanations that might be offered is what philosophers call abductive reasoning.
Abductive reasoning not only deduces a set of possible worlds that could exist based on the facts we have (i.
This system, from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, demonstrated the power of integrating multiple natural language processing techniques with abductive reasoning to produce a final score almost twice that of the other 27 groups that participated in the testing.
Perhaps the single most important factor that sets visualization apart from other knowledge discovery methods is the connection to the expert as a rich source of interpretation for the uncovered structure, thus opening the way for abductive reasoning to take place.