Abiding Conviction

Abiding Conviction

A definite conviction of guilt derived from a thorough examination of the whole case. Used commonly to instruct juries on the frame of mind required for guilt proved Beyond a Reasonable Doubt. A settled or fixed conviction.

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It gave me a crick in my neck, a lifelong fear of beards, and the abiding conviction that eight and nine-year-old boys know almost nothing.
In A Place in the Choir: Finding Harmony in a World of Many Voices, Jacobson reveals the source of his seemingly boundless energy: The deep abiding conviction that "All God's children got a place in the choir.
It (reasonable doubt) is that state of the case, which, after the entire comparison and consideration of all the evidence, leaves the minds of jurors in that condition that they cannot say they feel an abiding conviction, to a moral certainty, of the truth of the charge," he said.
Such a doubt must not influence you to disregard an aggravating circumstance if you have an abiding conviction that it exists.
To convict Paul Romando, you have to have an abiding conviction of the truth of the charges.
One match at a time is a cliche but also a truism and that is Woods' abiding conviction.
Centuries later, Augustine's ideas would be retrieved at the moment when social circumstances required the church to declare its abiding conviction that marriage, properly understood and freely entered, constitutes a lifetime bond.
Such a doubt must not influence you to return a verdict of not guilty if you have an abiding conviction of guilt.
Such symptoms must not influence you to return a diagnosis of no heart attack if you have an abiding conviction that it is a heart attack.
It is that state of the case which, after the entire comparison and consideration of all the evidence, leaves the minds of the jurors in that condition that they cannot say they feel an abiding conviction, to a moral certainty, of the truth of the charge.
Grusin greatly enlivens it through a close reading of the dying Parker's farewell letter to his congregation, where Parker credits his mother as the source of his own abiding conviction of God's indwelling presence in the soul.