abstention

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abstention

noun  abstemiousness, abstinence from action, avoidance, elusion, evasion, forbearance, holding off, inaction, refrainment
Associated concepts: abstention awaiting the state court's decision, abstention based on deferral, abstention based on state issues, doctrine of abstention
See also: absence, continence, desuetude, temperance

abstention

(US) the staying of a federal case because that court considers the issue can better be dealt with by a state court.

ABSTENTION, French law. This is the tacit renunciation by an heir of a succession Merl. Rep. h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
Abstentionism and eternal values can wait until later.
1-2) This they show was a significant development in mediating between established trajectories of revolutionary rupture versus incorporation, and of abstentionism versus protest and involvement and engagement.
The high levels of abstentionism should not be discounted," independent journalist Lydia Cacho said in a column in El Universal.
The vote was marred, however, by extremely high abstentionism, with only about 35% of registered voters bothering to go to the polls, said the Instituto Estatal Electoral de Oaxaca (IEEO).
If Mexico advances far into the World Cup playoffs, said researchers at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), this could increase abstentionism by at least five percentage points, even if there are no games on election day.
The CEM has also launched a campaign to promote voting and discourage abstentionism.
The decline of the PRI in Mexico state, along with high abstentionism, may have reflected voter repudiation of former governor Arturo Montiel, who dropped out of his party's presidential primary following allegations that he illegally used his office for personal enrichment (see SourceMex, 2005-10-26).
Plutarco Elias Calles in 1915 to discourage violence and abstentionism on election day.
The party charges that Marcos' negativity could promote abstentionism and hand the presidency to the hated PRI, which governed Mexico for 71 years until its loss in 2000 to Fox and the PAN.
Jose Antonio Crespo, a columnist for the Mexico City daily newspaper El Universal, also raised concerns about the potential for abstentionism, which he said was clearly evident in the recent election in Mexico state, where only 40% of registered voters cast a ballot (see SourceMex, 2005-07-20).
There will be a lot of abstentionism among residents of the ejido," they said.
The PRI's sweeping victory was marred by high abstentionism, with only about 40% of eligible voters bothering to cast a ballot.