Ad Hominem


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Ad Hominem

[Latin, To the person.] A term used in debate to denote an argument made personally against an opponent, instead of against the opponent's argument.

References in periodicals archive ?
One of the odder moments in the review leads Pine from an ad hominem attack on Harry White to a dated and misplaced diatribe about the term 'art' music, before arriving at the astonishing conclusion that EMIR 'strongly suggests musical and, dare I say it, social snobbery' (p.
Unabashedly a prosecution," Unhitched does little to stray from the usual ad hominem critiques to which Hitchens is usually subjected.
Ad hominem denigration of the deal's critics is not a worthy or useful line of argument, especially when facing so dangerous an opponent.
Mr Baker frequently resorts to ad hominem, untroubled by the possibility that some who oppose his beloved wind power stations may be greener than he, and maybe even more knowledgeable.
The government also admonishes preachers not to level ad hominem attacks against individuals or criticize the actions of friendly governments.
YK accused him of promoting Assad to the West-- he denies but stays away from the ad hominem attacks.
Some of these writers went beyond merely criticizing GE[micro]le's views but have been engaged with ad hominem attacks.
Apparently, you are too stupid to comprehend the difference between an insult and an ad hominem argument," someone argued.
As it turned out, nastiness by itself skewed perceptions; the presence of a personal, ad hominem attack within a reader comment led participants to think the risks of the technology were greater.
The unfounded, biased, ad hominem attacks are a disservice to the entire church: the bishops, the laity and your readers.
The new Editor-in-Chief, Janet Seggie, an ad hominem Professor in UCT's Faculty of Health Sciences, takes over as the first-ever woman in the post.
And finally, the ad hominem attack on Pogrebin is completely out of line.