Ad Hominem

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Related to Ad hominem argument: Circumstantial ad hominem

Ad Hominem

[Latin, To the person.] A term used in debate to denote an argument made personally against an opponent, instead of against the opponent's argument.

References in periodicals archive ?
The arguments against ad hominem argument are probably the only legitimate use of ad hominem arguments.
Ad hominem arguments, which are the essence of this book, provide irrelevant and insufficient grounds for evaluating scientific theories.
Tribalism is a special case of ad hominem argument, and a particularly dangerous one.
In sum, there are no perfect analogies, and the question of whether or not the ad hominem argument should be enough to stop the publication of "Goebbels" is still open but moot -- because all this new information had another result: It made us look harder at the book itself.
Brown, a figure in the Common Sense School of Philosophy, advanced an ad hominem argument using Hume's practical confidence in inductive reasoning to ascribe to Hume a belief that such reasoning is able to generate truths.
Ad hominem argument is a staple of ideological argument.
Ad hominem arguments used against President Obama embolden him to focus on the intractable problems facing America.
I was determined not to insult any of my opponents in debate, because I knew through experience that although the opposition feel no need to refrain from employing insults or ad hominem arguments, the instant our side so much as colours one word with even a tinge of sarcasm, we are immediately dismissed as unworthy of further debate.
guides the reader through this thicket of questions, giving the pros and cons on each question, but tending toward the so-called minimalist position although he avoids the ad hominem arguments that are common in this field today For each period G.
Unfortunately, in addition to being the kind of sweeping thesis that a short book cannot really make convincingly, it is marred by the author's frequent recourse to ad hominem arguments.