ambrosial

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The chants of the Ambrosian offertory: the antiphons "after the Gospel" and the offerendae.
Sometimes known as the Ambrosian Hymn, the Te Deum is an early Christian Latin text praising God.
John Chrysostom and end with a discussion of their attitude toward music, discovered most of the time only in their literary writings, with the exception of the Ambrosian Chants.
What is unusual in this canton, however, is that a number of carnivals are Ambrosian Rite events--meaning parishes follow a certain liturgical tradition--so the carnivals wind up on the Saturday after so-called Fat Tuesday.
Without minimizing the wealth of the other western traditions (Roman, Ambrosian, GaHican and Mozarabic) or those of the other eastern churches (Syrian, Alexandrian, Chaldean and Byzantine), I should like to list for you quickly this afternoon these treasures of the Armenian liturgy.
The Belford Singers will perform music from the 16th Century to the present day, while Exeter Camerata's music is sourced from a Fourth Century Ambrosian Chant.
but an indefinable sweetness growing up to it--the tender blossoming of fat--fat cropped in the bud--taken in the shoot--in the first innocence--the cream and quintessence of the child-pig's yet pure food--the lean, no lean, but a kind of animal manna--or, rather, fat and lean (if it must be so) so blended and running into each other, that both together make but one ambrosian result or common substance.
The original text of the Ambrosian Manuscript, with English trans.
National Philharmonic Orchestra, Ambrosian Opera Chorus and Boys Chorus.
London Sinfonietta, Ambrosian Chorus, John McGlinn, conductor
He began to build a series of large basilicas outside the walls of the city in an architectural style that became known as Ambrosian (McLynn, 1994).
Many Ambrosian works are translated in the Nicene & Post-Nicene Fathers series (New York, 1896), and the Fathers of the Church series (Catholic University, Washington, 1947-).