animal

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animal

noun animans, beast, beast of burden, beast of the field, brute, brute creation, created being, creature, pet, wild being
Associated concepts: animals of a base nature, domestic annmals, wild animal
Foreign phrases: Animalia fera, si facta sint mansueta et ex consuetudine eunt et redeunt, volant et revolant, ut cervi, cygni, etc., eo usque nostra sunt, et ita intelligunnur quamdium habuerunt animum revertendi.Wild aniials, if they are tamed, and are accustomed to leave and return, fly away and fly back, as stags, swans, etc., are connidered to belong to us so long as they have the intention of returning to us.

ANIMAL, property. A name given to every animated being endowed with the power of voluntary motion. In law, it signifies all animals except those of the him, in species.
     2. Animals are distinguished into such as are domitae, and such as are ferae naturae.
     3. It is laid down, that in tame or domestic animals, such as horse, swine, sheep, poultry, and the like, a man may have an absolute property, because they continue perpetually in his possession and occupation, and will not stray from his house and person unless by accident or fraudulent enticement, in either of which cases the owner does not lose his property. 2 Bl. Com. 390; 2 Mod. 319. 1.
     4. But in animals ferae naturae, a man can have no absolute property; they belong to him only while they continue in his keeping or actual possession; for if at any they regain their natural liberty, his property instantly ceases, unless they have animum revertendi, which is only to be known by their usual habit of returning. 2 Bl. Com. 396; 3 Binn. 546; Bro. Ab. Propertie, 37; Com. Dig. Biens, F; 7 Co. 17 b; 1 Ch. Pr. 87; Inst. 2, 1, 15. See also 3 Caines' Rep. 175; Coop. Justin. 457, 458; 7 Johns. Rep. 16; Bro. Ab. Detinue, 44.
     5. The owner of a mischievous animal, known to him to be so, is responsible, when he permits him to go at large, for the damages he may do. 2 Esp. Cas. 482; 4 Campb. 198; 1 Starkie's Cas. 285; 1 Holt, 617; 2 Str.1264; Lord Raym. 110; B. N. P. 77; 1 B. & A. 620; 2 C. M.& R. 496; 5 C.& P. 1; S. C. 24 E. C. L. R. 187. This principle agrees with the civil law. Domat, Lois Civ. liv. 2, t. 8, s. 2. And any person may justify the killing of such ferocious animals. 9 Johns. 233; 10. Johns. 365; 13 Johns. 312. The owner, of such an animal may be indicted for a common nuisance. 1 Russ. Ch. Cr. Law, 643; Burn's Just., Nuisance, 1.
     6. In Louisiana, the owner of an animal is answerable for the damage he may cause; but if the animal be lost, or has strayed more than a day, he may discharge himself from this responsibility, by abandoning him to the person who has sustained the injury; except where the master turns loose a dangerous or noxious animal; for then he must pay all the harm done, without being allowed to make the abandonment. Civ. Code, art. 2301. See Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.

References in classic literature ?
It is quite likely that, if we knew more about animal bodies, we could deduce all their movements from the laws of chemistry and physics.
We may say that an "instinctive" movement is a vital movement performed by an animal the first time that it finds itself in a novel situation; or, more correctly, one which it would perform if the situation were novel.
On the other hand, a movement is "learnt," or embodies a "habit," if it is due to previous experience of similar situations, and is not what it would be if the animal had had no such experience.
said he, "that animal goes quicker than the Abraham Lincoln.
The bullet did its work; it hit the animal, and, sliding off the rounded surface, was lost in two miles depth of sea.
Now I thought our expedition was at an end, and that we should never again see the extraordinary animal.
Those tertiary epochs, which we are apt to consider as abounding to an astonishing degree with large animals, because we find the remains of many ages accumulated at certain spots, could hardly boast of more large quadrupeds than Southern Africa does at present.
I do not here speak of the kind of vegetation necessary for their support; because, as there is evidence of physical changes, and as the animals have become extinct, so may we suppose that the species of plants have likewise been changed.
Ah, mine animals, this only have I learned hitherto, that for man his baddest is necessary for his best,--
Then did his animals prevent him from speaking further.
Some instances of correlation are quite whimsical; thus cats with blue eyes are invariably deaf; colour and constitutional peculiarities go together, of which many remarkable cases could be given amongst animals and plants.
When we look to the hereditary varieties or races of our domestic animals and plants, and compare them with species closely allied together, we generally perceive in each domestic race, as already remarked, less uniformity of character than in true species.