Antarctic Treaty of 1959

Antarctic Treaty of 1959

According to this treaty, Dec. 1, 1959, 12 U.S. T. 794, 402 U.N.T.S. 71. Antarctica—the land adjacent to the South Pole—is considered "international" territory, like that of the high seas; it is not under the jurisdiction of any single nation. Its legal status, therefore, is governed by International Law.

References in periodicals archive ?
Alexander Ponomarev celebrates the inhospitable continent which, since the Antarctic Treaty of 1959 has been protected as a site of transnational scientific research --a unique sort of geographical and cultural blank slate.
The United States and Russia were architects of the Antarctic Treaty of 1959 and today conduct some of the most extensive and diverse scientific activities in Antarctica.
The inspection will be conducted pursuant to the Antarctic Treaty of 1959 and its Environmental Protocol.
The Antarctic Treaty of 1959 established Antarctica as an area reserved for international scientific research and environmental preservation.
In the Southern Ocean the legal picture is further complicated by strict laws designed to protect Antarctica, Freestone said, citing the Antarctic Treaty of 1959 and its 1991 Madrid Environmental Protocol, as well as the 1980 Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources.
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