Areopagite


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Areopagite

a member of the AREOPAGUS.

AREOPAGITE. A senator, or a judge of the Areopagus. Solon first established the Areopagites; although some say, they were established in the time of Cecrops, (Anno Mundi, 2553,) the year that Aaron, the brother of Moses, died; that Draco abolished the order, and Solon reestablished it. Demosthenes, in his harangue against Aristocrates, before the Areopagus, speaks of the founders of that tribunal as unknown. See Acts of the Apostles, xviii. 34.

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57) In his turn Dionysius the Areopagite wrote that the exemplars of everything preexist as a transcendent unity within the Cause and produce the essences of things.
See Clement of Alexandria, Strondler's 5, 12 PG 3, 10 33 B; Gregory of Nyssa, Life of Moses, PG 44, 377 A mar 316B, 773B; and Dionysius the Areopagite, On Mystical Theology', PG.
31) The earliest work in which the Areopagite plays a substantial role is the Paradisus anime intelligentis, a collection of German sermons by Meister Eckhart and a number of other like-minded preachers.
In the sixth century Dionysius the Areopagite emphasized the superiority of mystical knowledge--which does not rely on words or reason--over a purely rational knowledge of God.
However, Gregory of Nyssa and Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite managed to raise such apophatic negation to a higher order of transcendence.
KEATS, DIRAC, DIONYSIUS THE AREOPAGITE, and Dogen, know some of that and Sesshu hurled it out in a splash of ink.
Karel Floss demonstrates the important place that Dionysius the Areopagite held in the thought of not only Ficino but also Ambrogio Traversari, Lefevre d'Etaples, and many medieval thinkers.
The classic exponent is the Dionysius long thought to be apostolic, the Areopagite from Acts 17 now called Pseudo-Dionysius, my longstanding research interest and suddenly the darling of some post-modems who want to "retrieve" the apophatic dimension in theology.
Paul and extending through the desert fathers and mothers, Dionysus the Areopagite, Maximus the Confessor, Augustine, Bernard of Clairvaux, Bonaventure, Meister Eckhart, Jan van Ruusbroec, Gregory Palamas, Dame Julian of Norwich, the anonymous author of The Cloud of Unknowing, Teresa of Avila, John of the Cross, Therese of Lisieux and Thomas Merton -- to name but a handful.
The author offers a lively account of the tradition of apophatic theology in the West from Denys the Areopagite through to the sixteenth century, devoting himself in particular to the use of metaphorical language to talk about God.
mentions Dionysius the Areopagite and John of the Cross whom she will treat in future volumes.