Back Pay Award

Back Pay Award

A legally enforceable decree ordering an employer to pay to an employee retroactively a designated increase in his or her salary that occurred during a particular period of employment. A decision rendered by a judicial or Quasi-Judicial body that an employee has a legal right to collect accrued salary that has not been paid out to him or her.

Back pay awards ensue from litigation involving employment discrimination and issues regarding labor-management relations. Federal Civil Rights legislation provides for back pay awards to compensate the victim for economic losses suffered as a result of discrimination.

References in periodicals archive ?
The dollar figure of the back pay award is in negotiation.
WASHINGTON, March 9, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A back pay award issued more than one year ago for $2.
In Alverez' original complaint, he had sought reinstatement to his former position, back pay since the date of his termination, interest on the back pay award, costs and attorney fees, and "any other relief deemed appropriate" by the FMSHRC.
Following the trial, the district court granted the plaintiff's post-trial motion to augment the jury's award to offset the negative tax consequences that she would incur from receiving the lump-sum back pay award.
2d DCA February 1, 2006), the court held that the plaintiff's attorneys' fees, costs and expenses, compensatory damages, and back pay award were collectively subject to the limitation on the "total amount of recovery" provided for in F.
The Court ruled that because the policy goals of IRCA outweigh those of the NLRA, the immigration act precluded any back pay award to undocumented immigrants under the labor act.
A NATIONALIST politician has condemned a pounds 25,000 Ministry of Defence back pay award to paratrooper Lee Clegg for his time in jail in relation to shooting at a stolen car in which two west Belfast teenagers were killed.
First, the Court reasoned that a back pay award would "subvert" IRCA because it would require "recognizing employer misconduct [under the NLRA] but discounting the misconduct [under IRCA] of illegal alien employees.
The Supreme Court recently held that a back pay award resulting from a Title VII claim for sex-based employment discrimination is not sheltered from taxation under the Sec.
The government, in its petition for Supreme Court review in the Burke case, argued that there was a conflict between Burke and the holding of the Fourth Circuit in Thompson that a back pay award was taxable.