backbencher

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backbencher

in Parliamentary procedure, a Member of Parliament who does not hold office in the government or opposition.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the Government is minded not to move out to keep these backbenchers happy.
Chairman Graham Brady is the keeper of letters written by backbenchers calling for a no-confidence vote in their leader.
One backbencher said: "It's something that is being looked at.
Carwyn is leading a charm offensive in the hope that he can settle down backbenchers who are panic-stricken over the possibility of losing their seats to the Tories at the Assembly election in 2016 - but if he hasn't got any answers, it isn't going to work.
Sir Albert has come in for criticism in recent months following the Kerslake Review, which demanded rapid change of the authority following major failings, and in involving backbenchers in the response.
While the backbenchers are keenly aware that the proposed law changes are opposed by a powerful coalition of ethnic and religious groups, the issue has united leaders from Australia's indigenous, Chinese, Jewish, Armenian, Arab, Korean, Greek, Vietnamese and Sikh communities, all of them calling for the Abbott government's exposure draft to be scrapped, the report adds.
Around 70 Conservative backbenchers have signed a tweaked amendment to the immigration legislation, originally tabled by Nigel Mills MP, which calls on the Government to reinstate restrictions on migrants from Romania and Bulgaria working in Britain until the end of 2018.
Tory backbenchers fear that the Mills amendment will not be called after Theresa May tabled 50 amendments, some of a highly technical nature, to the immigration bill for debate on Thursday.
Part of the role of the backbenchers is to criticise the government.
Backbencher Mark Field said if ministers failed to act, having raised the issue in public, they would simply fuel the disillusionment of voters who turned away from the party in Eastleigh.
The Deputy Prime Minister was given a rough ride by Tory backbenchers as he opened a two-day debate which could have profound consequences for the coalition.
Dorries echoed calls from other Tory backbenchers for the party to lurch to the right on law and order, immigration, gay marriage and other "red meat" issues.