Bill of credit


Also found in: Dictionary, Financial.

BILL OF CREDIT. It is provided by the Constitution of the United States, art. 1, s. 10, that no state shall " emit bills of credit, or make anything but gold and silver coin a tender in payment or debts." Such bills of credit are declared to mean promissory notes or bills issued exclusively on the credit of the. state, and for the payment of which the faith of the state only is pledged. The prohibition, therefore, does not apply to the notes of a state bank, drawn on the credit of a particular fund set apart for the purpose. 2 M'Cord's R. 12; 2 Pet. R. 818; 11 Pet. R. 257. Bills of credit may be defined to be paper issued and intended to circulate through the community for its ordinary purposes, as money redeemable at a future day. 4 Pet. U. S. R. 410; 1 Kent, Com. 407 4 Dall. R. xxiii.; Story, Const. Sec. 1362 to 1364 1 Scam. R. 87, 526.
     2. This phrase is used in another sense among merchants it is a letter sent by an agent or other person to a merchant, desiring him to give credit to the bearer for goods or money. Com. Dig. Merchant, F 3; 5 Sm. & Marsh. 491; R. M. Charlt. 151; 4 Pike, R. 44; 3 Burr. Rep. 1667.

References in periodicals archive ?
235) In the ensuing state-by-state vote, nine states voted for the motion to remove the bill of credit language, and two states voted against it.
Certainly, the Committee's coupling of the proposed federal bill of credit power with the borrowing power (248) suggests that it understood the specialized debt-representation aspect of bills of credit, as opposed to other forms of paper currency.
250) Even though the Convention later dropped the Committee's federal bill of credit language, it never restored Rutledge's proposed prohibition.