Black Letter Law


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Black Letter Law

A term used to describe basic principles of law that are accepted by a majority of judges in most states.

The term probably derives from the practice of publishers of encyclopedias and legal treatises to highlight principles of law by printing them in boldface type.

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District Court for the Southern District of New York, one of the first judges to endorse TAR, recently proclaimed that the right to use TAR for high-volume electronically stored information (ESI) cases is "now black letter law," reported Bond Schoeneck & King PLLC.
My appointment introduces interdisciplinary (not just law and economics, but also politics, sociology and philosophy) into the mix at the Cambridge Law Faculty -- traditionally an international reference point for doctrinal, black letter law, and an engagement with empirics.
May 20, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- California Attorney General Kamala Harris continues to substitute anti-gun policies for black letter law, say California gun rights groups The Calguns Foundation (CGF) and California Association of Federal Firearms Licensees (CAL-FFL).
Too many law firms just focus on the black letter law and don't add the commercial viewpoint that the client wants.
In addition to teaching students the black letter law of Article 9, the text explores the economic and commercial reasons underlying the law, as well as the nomenclature of secured credit and commercial law.
All of this advice goes beyond the traditional black letter law of reading contracts and documents but is an essential part of the advice and guidance law firms are providing to their clients.
Rather than purely advising clients on black letter law relating to licensing issues, this qualification has given me a fresh perspective in seeing things from my clients' point of view," he said.
the black letter law of rape, from its common law foundation through its
Mirza Ahmad, barrister and chief legal officer for Birmingham City Council, has supported the Black Letter Law campaign to increase the number of ethnic minority lawyers in the profession.
When explaining the core rules of the internal market, Davies recites the black letter law without providing much in the way of context.
Instead the anthropological contribution informs the black letter law that in its attempted translation of concepts and rules from the indigenous system to the national system it is striving 'to make commensurable concepts that derive from two systems of social meaning which may be wholly or partially irreconcilable.
In Australia at the moment we have a great opportunity to also demonstrate that black letter law and over-regulation will simply stifle the systems rather than promote it.