Black Letter Law

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Black Letter Law

A term used to describe basic principles of law that are accepted by a majority of judges in most states.

The term probably derives from the practice of publishers of encyclopedias and legal treatises to highlight principles of law by printing them in boldface type.

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And we will work with our fellow veterans service organizations, military organizations and associations, and others to move these bills through the legislative process and into black-letter law.
This absence is perhaps not surprising given the relative weakness of the presidency at the turn of the twentieth century and the paucity of black-letter law delineating the executive office.
It is black-letter law that government money cannot directly fund religious activities.
England) and Malena (a protection associate with UNHCR, the UN refugee agency, in Italy) blend legal, sociological, and policy-oriented research in order to investigate the combined effects of black-letter law and practical realities on inequalities experienced by non-EU migrants and asylum-seekers in the EU.
Such a path can only be well navigated by one who is in full command both of the background philosophical issues and of the relevant black-letter law.
With businesses operating in often competing and overlapping normative frameworks, preservation of corporate legitimacy, and the ever essential "social license to operate" necessitates consideration of more than black-letter law.
Holmes said the medical tribunal should take "a balanced view rather than trying to make a black-letter law on what is or isn't flirting".
As a law student, you learn black-letter law - it's all about exciting cases and theories and how to interpret the law and apply your knowledge.
The books are accompanied by Magic Memory Outline software that is designed to help students in synthesizing and summarizing the black-letter law and use acronyms and tips to assist in memorizing legal elements.
Today, as aging baby boomers watch the Schiavo case on national news and ponder their own end-of-life decisions, the question of who owns a deceased person's body begs for the black-letter law of statute.
William Van Regenmorter, described the statute as "a straightforward, clear, unambignous, black-letter law under which someone like Jack Kevorkian can be arrested and charged and prosecuted.
02 of the procedure recites a litany of black-letter law intended to emphasize the Commissioner's broad discretion to initiate changes in a taxpayer's method of accounting where the method does not clearly reflect income.