Black Letter Law

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Black Letter Law

A term used to describe basic principles of law that are accepted by a majority of judges in most states.

The term probably derives from the practice of publishers of encyclopedias and legal treatises to highlight principles of law by printing them in boldface type.

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from Harvard Law School, where he served as the Editor-in-Chief for the BlackLetter Law Journal.
from Harvard Law School, where he served as an executive editor of both the Harvard BlackLetter Law Journal and the Harvard Human Rights Journal.
Ogletree and Lani Guinier and was the executive editor of the Harvard BlackLetter Law Journal and the Harvard Human Rights Journal.
Schwartzreich L, 'Restructuring the framework for legal analyses of gay parenting', Harvard Blackletter Law Journal 21, pp 109-27, 2005
This one criticism does not taint the book's quality overall, but it does leave the reader somewhat unconvinced that the Supreme Court should have upheld the convictions in Cruikshank while following the blackletter law.
The standard blackletter law work on this topic states "Women are obligated -- according to most authorities -- to recite shemoneh esrei both shaharit and minhah.
In its ruling, the Court recited the blackletter law that a party seeking injunctive relief must demonstrate both that it will likely succeed on the merits and that it will be irreparably harmed if the injunctive relief is not granted.