accounts receivable

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accounts receivable

n. the amounts of money due or owed to a business or professional by customers or clients. Generally, accounts receivable refers to the total amount due and is considered in calculating the value of a business or the business' problems in paying its own debts. Evaluation of the chances of collecting based on history of customers' payments, quality of customers and age of the accounts receivable and debts is important. A big mistake made by people overly-eager to buy a business is to give too high a value to the accounts receivable without considering the chances of collection.

accretion: n. 1) in real estate, the increase of the actual land on a stream, lake or sea by the action of water which deposits soil upon the shoreline. Accretion is Mother Nature's little gift to a landowner. 2) in estates, when a beneficiary of the person who died gets more of the estate than he/she was meant to because another beneficiary or heir dies or rejects the gift. Example: if a brother and sister were supposed to divide a share of Dad's estate, but Brother doesn't want it, then Sister's share grows by accretion. 3) in trusts, accretion occurs when a beneficiary gets a surprising increase in benefits due to an unexpected event. (See: probate, trust)

References in periodicals archive ?
She also argues that book debt and commodity money exchanges "confined commercial transactions to relatively insular communities," (38) as though mere currency would have overcome poor transportation networks, rocky soil, low population density, the high cost of labor relative to land, and every other impediment to the production of a commercial surplus, and propelled people into a wider economic world.
She said: "In the past, a director of a company with few fixed assets, such as property or plant, would be readily prepared to give security over its book debts in order to get funding, and this was commonly provided in the form of a debenture.
The Brumark decision, which is likely to become law in the UK early next year, means that banks can no longer have a fixed charge on book debts, " explained Spielbichler.
It is not sufficient simply to prohibit disposal or other transfer of the book debts, for example by factoring, if the company is allowed to collect in and use the book debt proceeds freely.
6x Interest Coverage EBITDA (3) (C ) ($137,282) GAAP interest expense and preferred dividends (D) 137,766 EBITDA / GAAP Interest Expense (3) (C ) / (D) Neg RECONCILIATION OF NET INCOME TO EBITDA (3) Net income (loss) less preferred dividends ($292,553) Add: GAAP interest expense 127,186 Add: Depreciation, depletion and amortization 24,579 Add: Joint venture depreciation, depletion and amortization 3,506 EBITDA (3) ($137,282) (1) Leverage is calculated by dividing book debt net of unrestricted cash and cash equivalents by the sum of book equity, accumulated depreciation and loan loss reserves.
The redemption program is expected to reduce Unocal's book debt by nearly $269 million and cut the company's annual interest expense by about $16 million.
The ratings also assume that book debt will remain near $331 million in the near-term.
3% CREDIT STATISTICS Book Debt / Equity Book Debt (A) $3,842,856 Total Book Equity (B) $2,151,924 Book Debt / Book Equity (A)/(B) 1.
Book debt to equity ratio (including operating leases and hedges) moved from 51:49 at 30 June 2003 to 50:50 at 31 December 2003, principally as a result of stronger earnings during the half-year.
9% CREDIT STATISTICS Book Debt / Equity Book Debt (A) $3,655,003 Total Book Equity (B) $2,112,687 Book Debt / Book Equity (A) / (B) 1.
Accordingly, total book debt to capital is expected to be 130%-140% by year-end 2004 and remain near 100% through 2007.
Book debt to equity ratio moved from 49:51 at 30 June 2002 to 51:49 at 30 June 2003, principally as a result of the substantial investment in capital equipment made during the year.