border

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border

noun ambit, borderland, boundary, bounds, brim, brink, circumference, circumjacence, confine, edge, edging, end, enframement, extremity, flange, frame, fringe, frontier, hem, ledge, limit, line of demarcation, marge, margin, outline, outpost, outside, outskirts, pale, perimeter, periphery, purlieus, rim, selvedge, side, skirt, termination, verge
Associated concepts: border search

border

(Approach), verb abut upon, adjoin, align connergently, approximate, be in the vicinity of, be near, close on, come close, come to a point, concentrate, converge, draw near, encroach, gravitate toward, join, juxtapose, lie near, meet, move toward, near, neighbor, place in juxtaposition, place near, place parallel, proximate, put along side, skim, skirt, unite, verge, verge upon

border

(Bound), verb abut upon, adiacere, adjoin, appose, attach, attingere, be adjacent to, be circumjacent to, be conterminous, be contiguous, be in conjunction with, be in contact with, be juxtaposed, butt, cincture, circumpose, circumvalate, circumvent, close in, confine, conjoin, connect, contain, corral, cut off, define, delimit, delimitate, demarcate, edge, embrace, encase, enchase, enclose, enclose within bounds, encompass, ensphere, envelop, environ, extend to, flank, frame, gird, hem in, join, juxtapose, juxtaposit, lean against, lie contiguous to, lie next to, limit, mark off, meet end to end, meet with, outline, place limitations, proscribe, restrain, restrict, shut in, specify limits, stake out, surround
See also: abutment, ambit, boundary, circumscribe, connection, contact, contain, define, demarcate, enclose, enclosure, encompass, end, extremity, frontier, hedge, juxtapose, limit, margin, mete, outline, periphery, tenant, termination
References in periodicals archive ?
Prevalence and molecular characterization of pertactin-deficient Bordetella pertussis in the United States.
Seroprevelans of Bordetella pertussis immunoglobulin G antibodies among children in Samsun, Turkey.
The Bordetella Pertussis makes its way into the respiratory tract via inhalation and subsequently binds to and destroys the ciliated epithelial cells of the trachea and bronchi.
However, Bordetella pertussis is a fastidious organism and negative cultures do not rule out disease.
Estimating the role of casual contact from the community in transmission of Bordetella pertussis to young infants.
Topics include specialization in Bordetella as deduced from comparative genome analysis; the phylogeny, evolution and epidemiology of Bordetellae; the bvg regulon; Bordetella adhesins and toxins; Ptl Type III secretions in Bordetella subspecies; Ptl Type IV secretion systems; primary metabolism of physiology; bacteriophage and diversity-generating retroelements; biotechnological applications of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin; and pertussis vaccines.
The bacteria is very similar to Bordetella pertussis, which causes whooping cough in children.
They also confirm previous research in several countries which has shown that Bordetella pertussis (whooping cough) infection is an endemic disease among adolescents and adults and that the vaccine does not offer long-term protection.
Pertussis, also called whooping cough, is caused by Bordetella pertussis.
n The whooping cough germ, known as bordetella pertussis, is highly infectious and is spread in the droplets from coughs in infected people.
Bordetella pertussis does not survive well in the environment and is most likely spread from person to person during the incubation or catarrhal phase of the disease.
A d irect immunofluorescent assay for Bordetella pertussis was positive.