Pew

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PEW. A seat in a church separated from all others, with a convenient space to stand therein.
     2. It is an incorporeal interest in the real property. And, although a man has the exclusive right to it, yet, it seems, he cannot maintain trespass against a person entering it; 1 T. R. 430; but case is the proper remedy. 3 B. & Ald. 361; 8 B. & C. 294; S. C. 15 Eng. C. L. R. 221.
     3. The right to pews is limited and usufructuary, and does not interfere with the right of the parish or congregation to pull down and rebuild the church. 4 Ohio R 541; 5 Cowen's R. 496; 17 Mass. R. 435; 1 Pick. R. 102; 3 Pick. R. 344; 6 S. & R. 508; 9 Wheat. R. 445; 9 Cranch, R. 52; 6 John. R. 41; 4 Johns. Ch. R. 596; 6 T. R. 396. Vide Pow. Mortgages, Index, h.t.; 2 Bl. Com. 429; 1 Chit. Pr. 208, 210; 1 Pow. Mort. 17 n.
     4. In Connecticut and Maine, and in Massachusetts, (except in Boston), pews are considered real estate: in Boston they are personal chattels. In New Hampshire they are personal property. 1 Smith's St. 145. The precise nature of such property does not appear to be well settled in New York. 15 Wend. R. 218; 16 Wend. R. 28; 5 Cowen's R. 494. See Rev. St. Mass. 413; Conn. L. 432; 10 Mass. R. 323 17 Mass. 438; 7 Pick. R. 138; 4 N. H. Rep. 180; 4 Ohio R. 515; 4 Harr. & McHen. 279; Harr. Dig. Ecclesiastical Law. Vide Perturbation of seat; Best on Pres. 111; Crabb on R. P. Sec. 481 to 497.

References in periodicals archive ?
The chapel was known as 'the cawf 'oile', on account of its box pews and was built in 1632 by Ralph Assheton.
The size and design of the box pews on the bottom floor vary as they were built for different families, each of whom commissioned its own pew.
There are box pews, a Jacobean pulpit and an octagonal stone font.
Some panels, dated 1790 and inscribed with names, are thought to have come from box pews in the church in Aston where John Feeney's parents were buried.
It has box pews which have little doors with 'boys' and 'girls' marked on them.
All Saints church, which is medieval in parts, boasts a gallery, box pews and late Saxon carvings.
To the left of the door is an external staircase which led the local aristocracy to their box pews on the gallery, high above the peasantry.