Bring Suit

Bring Suit

To initiate legal proceedings; to start an action for judicial relief.

Under federal and most state law, a suit is commenced upon the filing of the first paper, which is the complaint, with the court. statutes of limitations set forth time boundaries within which an action must be brought.

See: charge, litigate, prosecute
References in classic literature ?
They next planned to get through politics what they could not get through law; they induced the Government to bring suit for the annulment of the Bell patents.
The company strongly maintains it did intend to bring suit, but refrained from doing so because of intervening patent reviews challenging certain MPHJ patents.
Thus, the court concluded that the plaintiff had sufficient notice before the statute of limitations had run to bring suit against the defendants.
However, the court noted that in addition to the two year statute of limitations, there was a one year statute of limitations for personal representatives of decedent's estates to bring suit for any cause of action the decedent had at the time of death.
Only parties genuinely injured by government action are allowed to bring suit.
To resolve them, EPA may issue a compliance order, assess an administrative penalty or bring suit against the company.
Accordingly, the Commissioner authorized the plaintiff to bring suit.
SB 796 (Dunn) has been amended to allow any employee to bring suit against an employer and act as attorney general to enforce any labor violations in civil actions.
Last year, survivors of the Srebrenica massacre tried to bring suit against the UN and Annan for their complicity in allowing Serbs to round up and massacre Muslims under the very noses of Dutch peacekeepers.
According to the commission's Web site, if conciliation is not successful, the commission may bring suit in federal court.
To follow these procedures, a taxpayer must first bring suit in the CIT for refund of the HMT.
Determining who is an employee is important for ERISA purposes; independent contractors, for example, are not allowed to participate in employee benefit plans or bring suit to enforce their rights under such plans.