Burgage


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Related to Burgage: socage, scutage, Serjeanty, Burbage

BURGAGE, English law. A species of tenure in socage; it is where the king or other person is lord of an ancient borough, in which the tenements are held by a rent certain. 2 B1. Com. 82.

References in periodicals archive ?
Even the sea caves are still visible within some of the burgage plots from the time Pembroke was surrounded by water and boats came up to the town walls.
Andrew Grant is quoting a guide price of pounds 350,000 for Burgage House, just a few doors away.
Tomorrow: Burgage Hall: Love Bites , with Late Shift.
Monday The Royal Oak, The Burgage, Prestbury Starts 7.
The three storey house at 29 Mill Street, close to the centre of the historic town, one of England's prettiest, occupies a medieval site on a long burgage plot.
The Burgage Stud owner said: "We wanted the previous foal, not least because we stand Bob Back, and we've bought this one for an Irish client.
The courtyard layout emulates the pattern of the former burgage plots onsite.
The chare probably originated as a lane between two medieval burgage plots.
Kerry & principal place of business at unit 9, Hazelwood Centre, Glanmire, Cork & (d)TDR Consultancy Ltd having its registered office & principal place of business at 21 Burgage Green, Newcastle, Co.
The first street recorded in the emerging town of Birmingham is Edgbastone Strete (Edgbaston Street) mentioned in a deed in 1347; and in 1449 Roger Cutte of Erdington granted to John and Juliane Knocks of Birmingham a burgage and butcher's shop in the same street.
Archeologists have discovered evidence of activity stretching back to the 13th century, with the site containing some of the city's last surviving remnants of the medieval property subdivision system, characterised by groups of long, thin plots known as burgage plots.
It has also been said that the Cottage was built on the footings of a medieval burgage plot just like other buildings on the east side of St Mary Street.