cancerous

(redirected from Cancer)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Cancer: lung cancer, Cancer treatment
See: malignant
References in periodicals archive ?
The literature on psychosocial influences on delay has, in the main, been related to women and breast cancer symptoms, the past decade seeing three major reviews in the field of breast cancer and delay (Caplan & Helzlsouer, 1992; Faccione, 1993; Ramirez, 1999).
Since 1993, incidence rates for breast cancer have stabilized and death rates have declined steadily since 1990.
During an average period of almost three years, invasive breast cancer was diagnosed in 9,364 women.
After tobacco smoking, obesity is the principal cause of cancer in the U.
Shaffer was diagnosed with breast cancer in March 1999.
I still think of myself as having had minor league cancer.
Johanna Budwig, a six-time Nobel Award nominee, discovered a totally natural formula that not only protects against the development of cancer, but people all over the world who have been diagnosed with incurable cancer and sent home to die have actually benefited from her research--and now lead normal lives.
So the one-chance indoctrination, and the urge to comply, ever so strong in Japanese society, creates a situation where the overwhelming majority of cancer treatments focus on improving methods that have been around for almost a hundred years: radiation, chemotherapies, and surgery-all of which can be considered "decisive".
When the cancer recurred last year--picked up during a routine chest X-ray--doctors quickly eased Ms.
Depressing as it seems, those are the odds we all must face, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS).
More than 200,000 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 55,000 cases of in situ disease are diagnosed annually in the United States (American Cancer Society 2003), and U.
Under the terms of this agreement (financial details were not disclosed), BTG has obtained exclusive worldwide rights to a series of novel quinazoline anti-tumor agents developed by Professor Ann Jackman and colleagues at The Institute of Cancer Research.