Canonist


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Related to Canonist: canon law

CANONIST. One well versed in canon or ecclesiastical law.

References in periodicals archive ?
The chapters of the book include considerations of Old Testament law from the perspective of the New Testament and the rise of postapostolic authority in the early office of the bishop; the classical foundations of law and polity in ancient Greece and Rome; early Christian proto-canonical collections; the canonical Epistles of the twelve Eastern Fathers; Tertullian and Lactantius; Augustine; the development of the Eastern Church's synodal process; the canons of the Seven Ecumenical Councils; later Byzantine codifications of Roman imperial law; and the work of late Byzantine canonists.
All this is summarized by Aquinas, but these basic terms, and this overall understanding, reflected both the specific work of the century of canonical thought before him and, more broadly, the influence of secular law and military and political practice on which the canonists drew.
Ian Waters, a canonist from the Melbourne archdiocese, speaking in his private capacity in Melbourne in October.
During a break one American canonist boasted that he had defended a Catholic hospital in Phoenix Arizona against a bishop who chastised it for performing an abortion.
18-20, after denying the applicability of the canonist analogy of the two great lights of the firmament, he proceeds by acquiescing in it for the sake of argument while giving it major corrections: the moon and sun were created separately; their beings are not interdependent; their functions are of separate derivation and different purpose: the moon radiates its own light, albeit not abundantly.
Focusing on Nicholas of Cusa's De concordantia catholica and papal bulls and canonists of that period, Muldoon examines medieval Christian concepts of authority in the context of the fifteenth-century European expansion into the "New Worlds" of Africa and the Atlantic islands.
Being eager to uphold real exchange as a licit contract, Cajetan rejects the opinion of early canonists, chiefly Geoffrey of Trani (d.
Thomas Doyle, then a canonist for the papal nuncio in Washington; and E Ray Mouton, a civil attorney hired by the Lafayette, La" diocese to represent a pedophilia priest.
As one canonist put it later: "Recent-day litigation and scandals are like the unpaid bills of the Church.
It is this last persona of Anselm of Lucca--as learned canonist, apologist, and zealous promoter of "Gregorian" ideals of ecclesiastical reform--that Kathleen Cushing's concise and meticulously researched study addresses.