Canons of Ethics

Canons of Ethics

Rules that govern the Practice of Law.

The canons of ethics have been replaced by the code of Professional Responsibility which sets forth the standards of professional conduct prescribed for lawyers in their professional dealings.

References in periodicals archive ?
All of the canons of ethics in journalism were still swirling in my 21-year-old head from the University of Missouri School of Journalism, the world's oldest (established in 1908) and (wait for it) still the best school of journalism on the planet.
This tendency has already infiltrated many regulatory regimes, not least the canons of ethics and their requirement of independence.
These efforts took three primary forms: the 1908 Canons of Ethics and model oath, the 1969 Model Code of Professional Responsibility, and the 1983 Model Rules of Professional Conduct.
The allegation must be taken seriously as it is a violation of the canons of ethics and the lawyer's oath taken prior to entering the practice of law.
Yet the canons of ethics, to which all lawyers must subscribe, provide that a lawyer cannot represent a client where the lawyer's own interest may materially limit that representation.
Although the notion of formal canons of ethics for judges in the United States is a phenomenon of the early twentieth century, the concept of impartiality derives from ancient law.
1 which reads "In all professional and business relations, the members of the Society shall be governed by the Canons of Ethics for Engineers incorporated in the Bylaws.
He says there are already many accountants and attorneys operating in a unified structure absolutely within the canons of ethics.
The committee also noted that, because such reporting is ethically required of a judge, it would be "incongruous if a judge were not immune for acts commanded by the disciplinary rule and the canons of ethics.
As a former practitioner of the law in three eastern states, after locating here I was astonished to learn that the local charter provision is in clear derogation of the Canons of Ethics established long ago by the American Bar Association.
Hare's two-level utilitarianism would undoubtedly advocate canons of ethics (at the intuitive level) that are specific to a given domain, such as law or medicine--as would various forms of rule utilitarianism.