capital

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capital

1) n. from Latin for caput, meaning "head," the basic assets of a business (particularly corporations or partnerships) or of an individual, including actual funds, equipment and property as distinguished from stock in trade, inventory, payroll, maintenance and services. 2) adj. related to the basic assets or activities of a business or individual, such as capital account, capital assets, capital expenditure, and capital gain or loss. 3) n. an amount of money a person owns, as in "how much capital do you have to put into this investment?" as distinguished from the amount which must be financed. (See: capital account, capital assets, capital gains or losses, stock in trade)

capital

noun assets, available means, balances, bank annuities, belongings, caput, cash supplies, credits, economic resources, finances, financial provision, financial resources, funds, funds for investment, funds in hand, holdings, income, investment portfolio, investments, line of credit, liquid assets, money, pecuniary resources, property, ready cash, receipts, reserves, resources, revenue, savings, sors, working assets
Associated concepts: authorized capital, capital account, capital assets, capital budget, capital case, capital construccion, capital contribution, capital crime, capital expenditure, capital gains, capital gains tax, capital improvement, capiial in a corporation, capital investment, capital loss, capital of a state, capital offense, capital outlay, capital paid-in, capital project, capital punishment, capital reserve, capital stock, capital surplus, circulating capital, distribution of capptal, equity capital, fixed capital, floating capital, impairrent of capital, reduction of capital, return of capital, stated capital, working capital
Foreign phrases: Excusat aut extenuat delictum in capitallbus quod non operatur idem in civilibus.That excuses or extenuates a wrong in capital cases which would not have the same effect in civil suits.
See also: assets, basic, cardinal, cash, central, deadly, essential, fund, important, leading, master, material, monetary, money, possessions, premium, prime, principal, resource, salient, seat, securities, security, select, share, stellar, stock, substance, treasury

CAPITAL, political economy, commerce. In political economy, it is that portion of the produce of a country, which may be made directly available either to support the human species or to the facilitating of production.
     2. In commerce, as applied to individuals, it is those objects, whether consisting of money or other property, which a merchant, trader, or other person adventures in an undertaking, or which he contributes to the common stock of a partnership. 2 Bouv. Inst. n. 1458.
     3. It signifies money put out at interest.
     4. The fund of a trading company or corporation is also called capital, but in this sense the word stock is generally added to it; thus we say the capital stock of the Bank of North America.

References in classic literature ?
It has been mentioned that Rebecca, soon after her arrival in Paris, took a very smart and leading position in the society of that capital, and was welcomed at some of the most distinguished houses of the restored French nobility.
I will go back to my capital, which I am glad to find is so near yours.
It appears that he got as far as Wara, the capital, where, according to some accounts, he was made prisoner, and, according to others, was put to death for having attempted to ascend a sacred mountain in the environs.
True, and you will grant that capital would perish if there were no labor to earn the dividends.
Constantinople was taken, plundered, and destroyed by these "pious brigands,"* and the last of the Byzantine Emperors was first blinded and then flung from a high tower, so that his body fell shattered to pieces on the paving-stones of his own capital.
Upon the fact that to the virtues and merits of the civilised Westerner there has become historically added--though this is not his chief point--a capacity for acquiring capital; whereas, not only is the Russian incapable of acquiring capital, but also he exhausts it wantonly and of sheer folly.
Seldom has a company been started with so small a capital and so vast a purpose.