cardinal

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cardinal

(Basic), adjective apical, basal, capital, chief, controlling, elemental, elementary, essential, first, foremost, fundamental, indispensable, key, main, necessary, overruling, pivotal, praecipuus, primal, primary, prime, primus, principal, rudimentary, strategic, substantial, substantive, summital, underlying, undermost, uppermost, utmost, vital
Associated concepts: cardinal rule

cardinal

(Outstanding), adjective absolute, all powwrful, best, central, chief, commanding, controlling, dominant, eventful, excellent, finest, foremost, greatest possible, highest, incomparable, inimitable, insurmountable, key, leading, major, maximal, momentous, most important, notable, paramount, praecipuus, preeminent, preponderant, prevailing, prime, primus, second to none, supereminent, superlative, supreme, top, unequaled, unexcelled, unparalleled, uppermost, utmost
See also: central, considerable, dominant, essential, fundamental, important, indispensable, integral, leading, material, paramount, prime, principal, salient, vital

CARDINAL, eccl. law. The title given to one of the highest dignitaries of the court of Rome. Cardinals are next to the pope in dignity; he is elected by them and out of their body. There are cardinal bishops, cardinal priests, and cardinal deacons. See Fleury, Hist. Eccles. liv. xxxv. n. 17, II. n. 19 Thomassin, part ii. liv. i. oh. 53, part iv. liv. i. c. 79, 80 Loiseau, Traite des Ordres, c. 3, n. 31; Andre, Droit Canon, au mot.

References in classic literature ?
It was a subtle, intelligent, crafty-looking face, a sort of combined monkey and diplomat phiz, before whom the cardinal made three steps and a profound bow, and whose name, nevertheless, was only, "Guillaume Rym, counsellor and pensioner of the City of Ghent.
The cardinal sets a spy upon a gentleman, has his letters stolen from him by means of a traitor, a brigand, a rascal-has, with the help of this spy and thanks to this correspondence, Chalais's throat cut, under the stupid pretext that he wanted to kill the king and marry Monsieur to the queen
Let whoever likes talk of the king and the cardinal, and how he likes; but the queen is sacred, and if anyone speaks of her, let it be respectfully.
After mass the young monarch drove to the Parliament House, where, upon the throne, he hastily confirmed not only such edicts as he had already passed, but issued new ones, each one, according to Cardinal de Retz, more ruinous than the others -- a proceeding which drew forth a strong remonstrance from the chief president, Mole -- whilst President Blancmesnil and Councillor Broussel raised their voices in indignation against fresh taxes.
Such was the state of affairs at the very moment we introduced our readers to the study of Cardinal Mazarin -- once that of Cardinal Richelieu.
Bernouin," said the cardinal, not turning round, for having whistled, he knew that it was his valet-de-chambre who was behind him; "what musketeers are now within the palace?
The cardinal, in deep thought and in silence, began to take off the robes of state he had assumed in order to be present at the sitting of parliament, and to attire himself in the military coat, which he wore with a certain degree of easy grace, owing to his former campaigns in Italy.
When he was left alone the cardinal looked at himself in the glass with a feeling of self-satisfaction.
Monsieur, like a good courtier, was inquiring of monsieur le cardinal after the health of his nieces; he regretted, he said, not having the pleasure of receiving them at the same time with their uncle; they must certainly have grown in stature, beauty and grace, as they had promised to do the last time Monsieur had seen them.
The court was young, it was true, but the avarice of the cardinal had taken good care that it should not be brilliant.
Not at all," replied the cardinal, forcing his Italian pronunciation in such a manner that, from soft and velvety as it was, it became sharp and vibrating, "not at all: I have a full and fixed intention to marry them, and that as well as I shall be able.
Parties will not be wanting, monsieur le cardinal," replied Monsieur, with a bonhomie worthy of one tradesman congratulating another.