catastrophe

(redirected from Catastrophes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
References in classic literature ?
I have seen Owen Chace, who was chief mate of the Essex at the time of the tragedy; I have read his plain and faithful narrative; I have conversed with his son; and all this within a few miles of the scene of the catastrophe.
He conjectured that these were remains of the victims of the catastrophe of 1820, and a minute inquest, immediately instituted by the local authorities, soon demonstrated the correctness of his supposition.
That infernal girl must have given the signal for some catastrophe.
When the news of this catastrophe spread from State to State the minds of the Women were violently agitated.
The result of such a catastrophe would mean no children in the community for another five years.
WE will not follow all the steps of the Admiral's return and installation, but hurry forward towards the catastrophe, merely chronicling by the way a few salient incidents, wherein we must rely entirely upon the evidence of Richard, for Esther to this day has never opened her mouth upon this trying passage of her life, and as for the Admiral - well, that naval officer, although still alive, and now more suitably installed in a seaport town where he has a telescope and a flag in his front garden, is incapable of throwing the slightest gleam of light upon the affair.
Like the Odyssey, it has a double thread of plot, and also an opposite catastrophe for the good and for the bad.
Higginbotham's catastrophe, hinting, what the pedlar had discovered in his own dealings with him, that he was a crusty old fellow, as close as a vice.
The simplest words must intimate, but not portray, the unutterable horror of the catastrophe.
It seemed to me that all the things I had known ought to have come down with a crash at the moment of the final catastrophe on the Spanish coast.
I should have been glad if he had fallen in love with Miss Bordereau's maid or, failing this, had taken her in aversion; either event might have brought about some kind of catastrophe, and a catastrophe might have led to some parley.
The disappearance of the Beauforts would leave a considerable void in their compact little circle; and those who were too ignorant or too careless to shudder at the moral catastrophe bewailed in advance the loss of the best ball-room in New York.