Chapter 11

(redirected from Chapter 11 Proceedings)
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Chapter 11

(US) part of the Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1978 that allows an alternative to liquidation under Chapter 7. The business is preserved as a going concern. There is usually no trustee, and the business maybe conducted by a committee of creditors. The debtor is given 120 days to submit a plan for liquidation or reorganization. All significant decisions need to be approved by the Bankruptcy Court. For the UK process of administration, see ADMINISTRATOR.
References in periodicals archive ?
While we are disappointed in the lender's intransigence, we want to assure our customers and suppliers that Sobelmar will continue to operate in the ordinary course of business during our Chapter 11 proceedings and that we intend to emerge from Chapter 11 on a financially sound footing.
The committee decided an objective of financial statements issued by an entity in chapter 11 proceedings should be to reflect its financial evolution during that period.
the potential adverse effects of the chapter 11 proceedings on the Company's liquidity or results of operations.
Island Pacific and 3Q Holdings Limited wants to clarify that Island Pacific is not part of the Chapter 11 proceedings of Retail Pro.
Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware is presiding over the Chapter 11 proceedings of DURA and its U.
our ability to obtain court approval with respect to motions in the Chapter 11 proceedings prosecuted from time to time.
The DIP loan market is changing at the same time the rules for Chapter 11 proceedings are changing.
These risks and uncertainties may include the outcome of the chapter 11 proceedings, the highly competitive nature of the glass container industry and the intense competition from makers of alternative forms of packaging; fluctuations in the prices for energy, particularly natural gas, and other raw materials; the Company's focus on the beer industry and its dependence on certain key customers; the seasonal nature of brewing and other beverage industries; volatility in demand from emerging new markets; the Company's dependence on certain executive officers; changes in environmental and other government regulations; and actions that may be taken by creditors and vendors.