Checkoff


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Checkoff

A system whereby an employer regularly deducts a portion of an employee's wages to pay union dues or initiation fees.

The checkoff system is very attractive to a union since the collection of dues can be costly and time-consuming. It prescribes the manner in which dues are paid by deductions in earnings rather than through individual checks sent directly to the union. Unions are thereby assured of the regular receipt of their dues.

A dues checkoff system is only lawful when voluntarily authorized by an employee. Unions have attempted to make alternatives to checkoff more onerous by requiring such practices as in-person delivery of dues checks to out-of-state locations. The national labor relations board has held that this type of inducement to checkoff is unlawful, however, as is the attempt by a union to collect assessments extending beyond periodic dues.

Cross-references

Labor Law; Labor Union.

References in periodicals archive ?
The checkoff box can be found on both the online and paper versions of the Voluntary Contribution Schedule Form 4642.
6 million in donations through the checkoff program, with an average donation of $10.
An organic research and promotion checkoff program would be a game changer for the entire organic sector.
Retailers and processors can work with the Beef Checkoff Program to receive a discount on the certification fee for the AHA Food Certification Program.
USDA proposed the second checkoff program following several years of reportedly unproductive discussions by a working group that was established to reform the current program.
Under the Hardwood Checkoff proposal, funding for the program would come from sawmills producers and kiln-operating facilities with annual sales in excess of $2 million.
Checkoff programs are collective marketing efforts funded by the product producers and run by an industry-governed board; coordinated through the USDA.
Readers may not be familiar with the checkoff by name (74) but have likely encountered the television advertisements bearing the slogan, "Beef.
We were disappointed to read an article in the Washington Monthly (Siddhartha Mahanta, "Big Beef," January/ February 2014) about the beef checkoff program containing a number of factual errors that could have been corrected if we had been contacted by the author.
A checkoff is an arrangement by which dues of labor-union members are withheld from wages and turned over to the union by the employer monthly/regularly.
First, with an annual checkoff collection of $80 million per year, the Beef Board is one of the largest federal marketing orders in the United States.
In Louisiana, the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries secured the enactment of an industry checkoff for alligator products.