tort

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tort

n. French for wrong, a civil wrong, or wrongful act, whether intentional or accidental, from which injury occurs to another. Torts include all negligence cases as well as intentional wrongs which result in harm. Therefore tort law is one of the major areas of law (along with contract, real property and criminal law), and results in more civil litigation than any other category. Some intentional torts may also be crimes such as assault, battery, wrongful death, fraud, conversion (a euphemism for theft), and trespass on property and form the basis for a lawsuit for damages by the injured party. Defamation, including intentionally telling harmful untruths about another, either by print or broadcast (libel) or orally (slander), is a tort and used to be a crime as well. (See: negligence, damages, assault, battery, fraud, wrongful death, conversion, trespass, defamation, libel, slander)

tort

noun breach of legal duty, civil wrong, dereliccion of duty, error, fault, invasion of a legal right, legal wrong, malfeasance, misdeed, misdoing, misfeasance, negligent act, personal wrong, private wrong, transgression, violation of a legal duty, wrong, wrongdoing, wrongful act
Associated concepts: action founded in tort, comparative negligence, continuing tort, contributory negligence, foreeeeable consequences, intentional tort, prima facie tort, proximate cause, standard of care, strict liability in tort, successive torts, tort feasor, tortious act, tortious conduct
See also: delict, delinquency, misconduct

tort

a civil wrong. Tortious liability arises from the breach of a duty fixed by law; this duty is towards persons generally and its breach is redressable by an action for unliquidated damages. It is part of the English law of obligations along with contract and restitution. See also ANIMAL LIABILITY, CONVERSION, DUTY OF CARE, ECONOMIC LOSS, ECONOMIC TORTS, EMPLOYER'S LIABILITY, FAULT, NEGLIGENCE, NUISANCE, OCCUPIER'S LIABILITY, PRODUCT LIABILITY, STRICT LIABILITY, TRESPASS, TROVER.

TORT. An injury; a wrong; (q.v.) hence the expression an executor de son tort, of his own wrong. Co. Lit. 158.
     2. Torts may be committed with force, as trespasses, which may be an injury to the person, such as assault, battery, imprisonment; to the property in possession; or they may be committed without force. Torts of this nature are to the absolute or relative rights of persons, or to personal property in possession or reversion, or to real property, corporeal or encorporeal, in possession or reversion: these injuries may be either by nonfeasance, malfeasance, or misfeasance. 1 Chit. Pl. 133-4. Vide 1 Fonb. Eq. 4; Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.; and the article Injury.

References in periodicals archive ?
The case of a worldwide harmful practice, in which a tension (even collision) exists between two fields of law, religious family and civil tort (and sometimes also contract law), presents a case of legal pluralism.
It is also about actions, behaviors, or products never mentioned or touched in a civil tort case where a rational actor changes behavior because of perceived risks to users and consumers.
Though civil tort damages have the same types of proximity and certainty requirements as criminal restitution, (198) a civil tort suit has two key advantages over a criminal restitution hearing, both of which make recovery more likely.
The remainder of this Essay will criticize the American doctrine of the presumption of innocence and propose a different way of allocating burdens of proof, as well as suggesting different standards of proof in criminal trials or civil tort proceedings.
Instances of individuals' successfully pursuing civil tort actions against terrorist tort feasors or their sponsors include:
In a decision handed down last June, a state court of appeals grappled with the issue of whether the doctrine of res judicata precludes spouses from filing civil tort claims after a divorce petition has been filed.
It can be argued that these cases stand for the general proposition that courts are "not overly interested in civil tort cases but under extreme pressure to answer the growing question of how trial judges can deal with cases involving hundreds of thousands of claims arising from a single event or line of products.
While complete justice for victims of violence ideally includes criminal prosecution as well as a civil tort remedy, the failure to prosecute the crime does not negate the value of a civil judgment.
An increase in civil tort litigation cases has also contributed to the trend toward implementing life safety and security measures in residential buildings.
This allegation, if proven, will entitle Athlon to punitive damages for this civil tort.
The authors thoroughly review the validity of injury prevention laws, the role of civil tort litigation in reducing injury, and the difficulties in objectively measuring whether statutory and common law injury prevention laws really work.