clergy

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clergy

ministers, priests or pastors of churches. Historically clergy were exempt from trial or punishment before the secular courts, which was known as benefit of clergy. On the other hand, until the House of Commons (Removal of Clergy Disqualification) Act 2001, clergy could not sit in the House of Commons. (Lords Spiritual who sit in the House of Lords are still excluded from the Commons.)

CLERGY. All who are attached to the ecclesiastical ministry are called the clergy; a clergyman is therefore an ecclesiastical minister.
     2. Clergymen were exempted by the emperor Constantine from all civil burdens. Baronius ad ann. 319, Sec. 30. Lord Coke says, 2 Inst. 3, ecclesiastical persons have more and greater liberties than other of the king's subjects, wherein to set down all, would take up a whole volume of itself.
     3. In the United States the clergy is not established by law, but each congregation or church may choose its own clergyman.

References in periodicals archive ?
However, clergywomen assume these dual roles alone, while balancing family responsibilities.
This book examines the effects of gender, professional experience, and religious belief on the political attitudes and activism of clergywomen.
In this qualitative study of clergywomen (N = 190), the authors examined the impact of being female in a male-dominated occupation, particularly one that has been traditionally structured as a "2-person career.
TV VICAR Dawn French joined 200 clergywomen seeking an end to world poverty yesterday.
Canon Caroline Dick and Revs Mary Judson, Val Shedden and Elaine Srivens from Durham, together with Joan Dotchin, Sheila Hamil and Jenny Lancaster from Newcastle, were joined by hundreds of other clergywomen from across the country.
The card, signed by clergy of all denominations, was presented by French - who plays The Vicar of Dibley on TV - and a delegation of 10 clergywomen.
Canon Caroline Dick and six other North clergywomen were joined by hundreds of others from across the UK in support of the Make Poverty History campaign with a march down Whitehall.
Second, while previous studies have concentrated exclusively on male clergy and seminarians, the present study proposes to undertake separate analyses among clergymen and clergywomen.
From Preachers to Suffragists: Woman's Rights and Religious Conviction in the Lives of Three Nineteenth-Century American Clergywomen (Westminster John Knox Press & Geneva Press $24.
Certainly, clergywomen in mainline denominations such as Methodist, Presbyterian, and Episcopalian are not required to defer their own agency to the same degree as Pentecostal women and are more likely to claim their right to the denominational vestments and all the power and authority those vestments signify when they complete seminary and enter the market for a church.
And then he goes on to say: "Economists are better equipped [sic] for handling moral questions, by and large, than are clergymen and clergywomen.