clergy

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clergy

ministers, priests or pastors of churches. Historically clergy were exempt from trial or punishment before the secular courts, which was known as benefit of clergy. On the other hand, until the House of Commons (Removal of Clergy Disqualification) Act 2001, clergy could not sit in the House of Commons. (Lords Spiritual who sit in the House of Lords are still excluded from the Commons.)

CLERGY. All who are attached to the ecclesiastical ministry are called the clergy; a clergyman is therefore an ecclesiastical minister.
     2. Clergymen were exempted by the emperor Constantine from all civil burdens. Baronius ad ann. 319, Sec. 30. Lord Coke says, 2 Inst. 3, ecclesiastical persons have more and greater liberties than other of the king's subjects, wherein to set down all, would take up a whole volume of itself.
     3. In the United States the clergy is not established by law, but each congregation or church may choose its own clergyman.

References in periodicals archive ?
Self-report questionnaires were distributed at a plenary session during a national conference for United Methodist clergywomen.
At Holyrood, 40 clergywomen handed Jack McConnell their manifesto.
Support for the perspective proposed by biblical theology is found among the sample of clergywomen.
In my small university town in the Midwest, I know one woman Episcopal priest quite well, and I have written about her and her female clergywomen counterparts in the town in which we reside.
Those clergywomen who do stay within parish ministry, however, must not become too discouraged if they find that, even years later, they still feet like outsiders.
It includes the history of clergywomen in African-American and Euro-American communions and those that developed in the U.
Eliad Dias dos Santos, a Methodist clergywomen who works with prostitutes in Sao Paulo, opposes prostitution but admits that the church is partly responsible for the women's situation.
Thinking that her chances of being elected bishop as an African-American woman in the South were slim, she agreed to allow a group of clergywomen in California to nominate her.
Fisher is an active member of many church and community organizations a sampling of which includes United Methodist Neighborhood Services, Northeastern Jurisdiction Black Clergy and Clergywomen, General Board of Church and Society of the United Methodist Church, Religious Council of West Chester, World-Wide Women Ministries Alliance, NAACP, and West Goshen Lions.
Through ethnographic interviews of five clergywomen, Campbell-Reed unlocks larger leadership, polity, and theological issues at stake for all in Baptist life.
The call for papers inspired one of us (Joyanne) to contact the other (Shelley-Ann) via email and suggest to her that this was an opportunity to relate an untold story of the experiences of Anglican clergywomen in Trinidad and Tobago, most of whom are of African descent.
This particular study of women leaders in the church, therefore, can never be repeated, but provides a benchmark against which future generations of clergywomen can be measured.