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It's Been Said Before: A Guide to the Use and Abuse of Cliches reportedly examines why certain phrases become cliches and why they should be avoided - or why they still have life left in them.
The research also found that one in three bosses had told employees not to use cliches in meetings with clients.
I suggest forming a secret society, the object of which would be to stem the use of cliches with the likes of a think tank, county, spin doctors, eggheads, quangos and boffins taking part.
Finished cliches are said to be ready to use in pad printers without further processing; no washout chemicals are necessary.
About evenly balanced between standard readjustment cliches and moving, specific insights, and between compelling moments and overacted outbursts.
The meanings and origins of literally thousands of words and definitions come to life in a newly expanded, updated edition of a popular title, which adds hundreds of new cliches from all walks of life -including the business world as well as popular culture--and provides an indexed, cross-referenced survey of all.
The promotion will run until July 15, six days after the final match of the World Cup has been held, and by which time the nation will have heard more than enough football cliches, according to Ginsters.
What I mean by that is that any staff member who slips and uses one of the many cliches floating around gets a good-natured ribbing.
In a desert of neo-soul cliches, The Blue State effectively mixes politics, partying and real life without degenerating into vapidity or sloganeering.
These are monographs that consciously build upon the important urban histories of the 1980s and 1990s, particularly Jackson's Crabgrass Frontier and Thomas Sugrue's 1996 study The Origins of the Urban Crisis, but that stand on their own as studies that expand the definition of the suburb well beyond suburban cliches and properly situate it is its metropolitan political context.
The man has fashioned a career out of locating or inventing a crude symbolic shorthand to explain and even popularize complex international phenomena while relying on a small cast of elites from politics, academia, and business to agree with his global cliches.
Here, Grimonprez's use of cliches results in an image that is both familiar and unprecedented.