client

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Client

A person who employs or retains an attorney to represent him or her in any legal business; to assist, to counsel, and to defend the individual in legal proceedings; and to appear on his or her behalf in court.

This term includes a person who divulges confidential matters to an attorney while pursuing professional assistance, regardless of sub-sequent employment of the attorney. This attorney-client relationship is quite complex and extensive in its scope. One of the key aspects of this relationship is confidentiality of communications. A client has the right to require that his or her attorney keep secret any discussion between them during the course of their relationship that pertains to the matters for which the attorney is hired. This protection extends to a person who might have disclosed any confidential matters while seeking aid from an attorney, whether the attorney was employed or not. If, for example, someone is "shopping" for an attorney to handle a Divorce, the person might reveal certain private information to several attorneys, all of whom are expected to keep such communications confidential.

Cross-references

Attorney-Client Privilege.

client

noun business contact, buyer of labor, cliens, consultor, consumer, customer, employer of legal advice, hirer, offerer, patron, patron of professional servies, person employing advice, person represented, person represented by counsel, purchaser, retainer of counsel
Associated concepts: attorney-client privilege, attorneyylient relationship
See also: consumer, customer, patron

CLIENT, practice. One who employs and retains an attorney or counsellor to manage or defend a suit or action in which he is a party, or to advise him about some legal matters.
     2. The duties of the client towards his counsel are, 1st. to give him a written authority, 1 Ch. Pr. 19; 2. to disclose his case with perfect candor3. to offer spontaneously, advances of money to his attorney; 2 Ch. Pr. 27; 4. he should, at the end of the suit, promptly pay his attorney his fees. Ib. His rights are, 1. to be diligently served in the management of his business 2. to be informed of its progress and, 3. that his counsel shall not disclose what has been professionally confided to him. See Attorney at law; Confidential communication.

References in classic literature ?
The client looked scared, but bewildered too, as if he were unconscious what he had done.
The portly client puffed out his chest with an appearance of some little pride and pulled a dirty and wrinkled newspaper from the inside pocket of his greatcoat.
I have advised a prodigious number of clients, and have dealt with some exceedingly awkward difficulties, in my time.
In the detestable slang of the day, we were now both "at a deadlock," and nothing was left for it but to refer to our clients on either side.
All I know is,' said Miss Sally, smiling drily, for she delighted in nothing so much as irritating her brother, 'that if every one of your clients is to force us to keep a clerk, whether we want to or not, you had better leave off business, strike yourself off the roll, and get taken in execution, as soon as you can.
Your honor, in our remarks at the opening of this trial, we foreshadowed our purpose to prove that our client did this fearful deed while under the influence of a blind and irresponsible delirium produced by drink.
He still had his wig and gown on, and he said, squaring himself at his late client to that degree that he squeezed the innocent Mr.
Carew was my client, but so are you, and I want to know what I am doing.
Sherlock Holmes rubbed his hands with delight, and I stared with astonishment at our client.
Come and dine with me tonight if you're free, and we'll go into the matter afterward: in case you wish to call on our client tomorrow.
Underneath the vigorous headlines which our client had quoted, I read the following suggestive narrative:
Liverpool was a little tired of answering questions, and more than a little tired of this mysterious client.