Code of Hammurabi

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Code of Hammurabi

The Code of Hammurabi was a comprehensive set of laws, considered by many scholars to be the oldest laws established; they were handed down four thousand years ago by King Hammurabi of Babylon. Although the Code of Hammurabi was essentially humanitarian in its intent and orientation, it contained the "eye for an eye" theory of punishment, which is a barbarian application of the concept of making the punishment fit the crime. The Code of Hammurabi recognized such modern concepts as that of corporate personality.

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A set of laws called Codex Hammurabi is eponymously named after Babylon's most famous ruler, King Hammurabi.
In terms of other legally oriented texts, there is the celebrated Codex Hammurabi, discovered at Susa at the outset of the twentieth century.
Inu Anum Sirum: Literary Structures in the Non-Juridical Sections of Codex Hammurabi.
See my study, "Legal Continuation and Reform in Codex Hammurabi, paragraphs 168-169," ZAR 5 (1999): 54-65.
b) Sections 168-69 of Codex Hammurabi are laws that regulate the negation of a lawful child's legal status by his uprooting from the father's house.
It is possible that sections 168-69 of Codex Hammurabi were intended to restrict the authority of a father even further.

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