collection

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collection

(Accumulation), noun accession, acervation, acervus, acquisition, addition, aggregate, aggregation, amassment, amount accrued, compilation, concentration, congestus, conglomerate, convergence, cumulation, group, growth by addition, heap, hoard, mass, obtainment, pile, stockpile, store
Associated concepts: collection of trust funds

collection

(Assembly), noun aggregation, association, audience, colligation, collocation, conflux, congregation, conventicle, convention, crowd, forgathering, gathering, group, ingathering, meet, meeting, multitude, muster, rally, reassembly, throng
Associated concepts: freedom of assembly

collection

(Payment), noun acquittance, amends, bearing the cost, cash payment, clearance, compensatio, compensation, contribution, defrayal, disbursement, discharge, enforcement of judggent, expenditure, fulfillment, full satisfaction, guerdon, indemnification, indemnity, installment, making amends, money paid, paying for, payment, price, propitiation, quid pro quo, quittance, receipted payment, recompense, redress, reimbursement, remission, remittance, remuneration, reparation, repayment, requital, restitution, restoration
Associated concepts: collecting bank, collection agencies, collection agent, collection and payment, collection attorrey, collection districts, collection of money, collection of taxes, collection officer, for collection only endorsements
See also: agglomeration, aggregate, assemblage, assembly, band, code, combination, compilation, conglomeration, congregation, corpus, cumulation, depository, digest, hoard, levy, store
References in classic literature ?
But take it away, and all appropriation ceases, and a very pretty gallant charade remains, fit for any collection.
As far as it would contribute to rendering regulations for the collection of the duties more simple and efficacious, so far it must serve to answer the purposes of making the same rate of duties more productive, and of putting it into the power of the government to increase the rate without prejudice to trade.
ILLINGWORTH (rising): `Our point is that such a collection might have been made in other places than a prehistoric plateau.
I promised to show you my collection," he added, turning to Lydgate; "shall we go?
He had a cent in his pocket for the Sunday School collection, and a five-cent piece for the church collection; he carried his Bible in one hand and his Sunday School quarterly in the other; he knew his lesson and his Golden Text and his catechism question perfectly.
The most harmless of Bixiou's jokes perpetrated among the clerks was the one he played off upon Godard, presenting him with a butterfly just brought from China, which the worthy man keeps in his collection and exhibits to this day, blissfully unconscious that it is only painted paper.
I traded for postage-stamps, for minerals, for curios, for birds' eggs, for marbles (I had a more magnificent collection of agates than I have ever seen any boy possess--and the nucleus of the collection was a handful worth at least three dollars, which I had kept as security for twenty cents I loaned to a messenger-boy who was sent to reform school before he could redeem them).
But this idea was dispelled when it was learned that he had sold all his possessions,--his city mansion, his country house at Menlo Park, his paintings, and collections, and even his cherished library.
But what are these among so many,' into our own tongue for the benefit of the church, and some collections out of the Book of Notes of Bishop Isidor.
The crust of the earth is a vast museum; but the natural collections have been made only at intervals of time immensely remote.
I shall have the pleasure of acknowledging the great assistance which I have received from several other naturalists, in the course of this and my other works; but I must be here allowed to return my most sincere thanks to the Reverend Professor Henslow, who, when I was an undergraduate at Cambridge, was one chief means of giving me a taste for Natural History, -- who, during my absence, took charge of the collections I sent home, and by his correspondence directed my endeavours, -- and who, since my return, has constantly rendered me every assistance which the kindest friend could offer.
They rendered the whole nation familiar for centuries with one of the grandest and most varied of all collections of books, which was adopted with ardent patriotic enthusiasm as one of the chief national possessions, and which has served as an unfailing storehouse of poetic and dramatic allusions for all later writers.

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