Commons


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Commons

see HOUSE OF COMMONS.

COMMONS, Eng. law. Those subjects of the English nation who are not noblemen. They are represented in parliament in the house of commons.

References in classic literature ?
Nowadays most people die of a sort of creeping common sense, and discover when it is too late that the only things one never regrets are one's mistakes.
I cannot talk to you, sir,' replied Lord George in a loud voice, and waving his hand in a disturbed and agitated manner; 'we have nothing in common.
Well, Pip," said Joe, "be it so or be it son't, you must be a common scholar afore you can be a oncommon one, I should hope
Yet he had, he said, been too busy all his life to spend much time in public- houses, as we drank a pint of ale together in the inn which stood at the end of the common.
In choosing persons for all employments, they have more regard to good morals than to great abilities; for, since government is necessary to mankind, they believe, that the common size of human understanding is fitted to some station or other; and that Providence never intended to make the management of public affairs a mystery to be comprehended only by a few persons of sublime genius, of which there seldom are three born in an age: but they suppose truth, justice, temperance, and the like, to be in every man's power; the practice of which virtues, assisted by experience and a good intention, would qualify any man for the service of his country, except where a course of study is required.
Controversies and wars among the members themselves have been so common, that the German annals are crowded with the bloody pages which describe them.
A zeal for different opinions concerning religion, concerning government, and many other points, as well of speculation as of practice; an attachment to different leaders ambitiously contending for pre-eminence and power; or to persons of other descriptions whose fortunes have been interesting to the human passions, have, in turn, divided mankind into parties, inflamed them with mutual animosity, and rendered them much more disposed to vex and oppress each other than to co-operate for their common good.
When, therefore, capital is converted into common property, into the property of all members of society, personal property is not thereby transformed into social property.
The two men hurried back at once to the common, and found the cylinder still lying in the same position.
On the other hand, things are said to be named 'univocally' which have both the name and the definition answering to the name in common.
It is in the state that that common seeking after the good which is the profoundest truth about men and nature becomes explicit and knows itself.
Abandoning the conception of cause, mathematics seeks law, that is, the property common to all unknown, infinitely small, elements.