companion

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Related to Companion star: Binary star system
See: associate, coconspirator, cohort, colleague, complement, confederate, consociate, consort, copartner, correlate, participant, partner, peer, similar

companion

in employment law, a person who accompanies a worker at a disciplinary or grievance hearing. The employer is under a duty to permit such a companion - chosen by the worker - to appear. The employer must permit the worker's companion to address the hearing in order to put the worker's case, sum up that case, respond on the worker's behalf to any view expressed at the hearing and confer with the worker during the hearing.

COMPANION, dom. rel. By 5 Edw. III., st. 5, c. 2, Sec. 1, it is declared to be high treason in any one who "doth compass or imagine the death of our lord the king, or our lady his companion," &c. See 2 Inst. 8, 9; 1 H. H. P. C. 124.

References in periodicals archive ?
They were then captured by the smaller companion star.
The gravitational effects from the hot and super dense white dwarf are so strong that it has forced the companion star to swell up like a massive balloon and move towards it.
Astronomers believe the companion star took most of the hydrogen surrounding the exploding main star and continued to burn as a super-hot helium star.
That, in addition to the star system's young age, has led to two possible theories: either a neutron star can be born with a weak magnetic field, or it can quickly become de-magnetized as it pulls material from its companion star onto itself.
Because the planet is relatively close to its own sun, the gravity from the companion star doesn't affect it much.
In work published in The Astrophysical Journal, the Monash and Warwick scientists significantly improved the precision with which they could measure the orbit of Scorpius X-1, a double star system containing a neutron star that feeds off a nearby companion star.
5 ( ANI ): X-rays streaming towards Earth from the region near a neutron star that is cannibalizing its companion star are the youngest "X-ray binary" yet known, according to scientists.
A nova erupts when a white dwarf, the burned-out core of a sun-like star, has siphoned off enough hydrogen from a companion star to trigger a thermonuclear runaway.
Scientists already know of other supernova remnants that contain black holes, like SS433, a binary system composed of a black hole that is producing huge jets of gas, and a companion star that's 20 times the mass of our Sun.
These first observations revealed that the pulsar was spinning more than 30 times each second and was gravitationally bound to a companion star, which was initially identified as either another neutron star or, more likely, an uncommonly cool white dwarf.
org, match astronomers' ideas about what would be left if a blue straggler took gas from a now-defunct companion star.
This star's capricious behavior appears to be fueled by a nearby companion star and may give new insights into the birth of millisecond pulsars, the astronomers said.