conception

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conception

(Beginning), noun concept, design, idea, ingenuity, invention, notion, original plan, origination, plan, thought

conception

(Insemination), noun beginning of life, fecundation, fecundity, fertilization, impregnation, inceppion of pregnancy, pregnancy, superimpregnation
See also: apprehension, arrangement, cognition, comprehension, concept, conviction, design, idea, impression, notion, perception, perspective, persuasion, plan, presumption, side, supposition, understanding, vision
References in periodicals archive ?
Conception occurred after treatment in 57% of the women, and conception was spontaneous in 14%, Sara Malchau, MD, reported at the annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.
It is not surprising then, that student alternative conceptions abound in science education (Vosniadou and Ioannides, 1998).
Extraordinary Conceptions has encountered kindhearted women who have wanted to help childless individuals and couples experience the love of a child through surrogacy.
Published today (25 February 2014) by the Office of National Statistics, the number of under 18 conceptions also fell, by 10.
But experts on Teesside have been quick to point out the rise is hopefully just "a blip" in what has been a steady decline in under-18 conceptions.
Teenage conceptions in North Tyneside has fallen by 38.
This research analyzed conceptions of environment in a continuing education course for science teachers developed at the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Bringing in nurses at secondary schools was highlighted as one of the reasons why the number of conceptions among 15 to 17-year-olds in Wales fell by nearly 10% over a year.
3 conceptions per 1,000 women aged 15-17 in 2008, which fell to 60.
There were 164 conceptions among 15-17 year olds in 2007, compared to 145 in 2008.
7 per cent and teenage conceptions leading to births have slumped by 23.
Here he attempts too much, presenting and critiquing conceptions of justice from the Utilitarians, Rawls, Nozick, Catholic social teaching, Reinhold Niebuhr, and liberation theology.