conscience clause

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conscience clause

a clause in a law or contract exempting persons with moral scruples. See e.g. ABORTION.
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It is true that some laws contain a conscience clause.
So, even as the Church collected political victories in the form of individual state conscience clauses, the CHA and the USCCB remained focused on a move designed to protect them in court: revision of the Directives, by now a chronic source of frustration for hospital administrators.
Conscience clauses contribute to a legal landscape of diminishing access to abortion and of opposition to family planning services.
Built-in conscience clauses allow pharmacists to opt-out of provision on moral or religious grounds, providing they refer patients to other providers willing to prescribe the product.
Conscience clauses explicitly protect this interest.
85 (2007) (arguing that conscience clauses are becoming overly broad, endangering the health of those who are refused treatment); Lora Cicconi, Comment, Pharmacist Refusals and Third-Party Interests: A Proposed Judicial Approach to Pharmacist Conscience Clauses, 54 UCLA L.
Most state conscience clause statutes, on the other hand, allow health care workers generally regardless of their status as employee or independent contractors--to refuse to provide certain services," she said.
For up-to-date information on conscience clauses check NCSL's Web page at www.
If a pharmacy is going to be in a business of stocking and dispensing contraceptives, it shouldn't make judgments about who should or should not have access to those contraceptives," says a Blagojevich spokeswoman, adding the governor does not believe that pharmacists are covered by conscience clauses.
Reproductive choices are already limited in Peru, with conscience clauses allowing physicians to opt out of giving care they deem offensive, including emergency contraception and post-abortion care.
Can conscience clauses protect Catholic and other religious health professionals' moral claims to freedom of the exercise of their conscience?