cottage

(redirected from Cottages)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
See: domicile, home

COTTAGE, estates. A small dwelling house. See 1 Tho. Co. Litt. 216; Sheph. Touchst. 94; 2 Bouv. Inst. n. 1571, note.
     2. The grant of a cottage, it is said, passes a small dwelling-house, which has no land belonging to it. Shep. To. 94.

References in classic literature ?
He stopped before the door of his own cottage, which was the fourth one from the main building and next to the last.
It seems as innocent of a destination as a boy on an errand; but, after taking at least six times as long as any other road in the kingdom for its amount of work, you usually find it dip down of a sudden into some lovely natural cul-de-sac, a meadow-bottom surrounded by trees, with a stream spreading itself in fantastic silver shallows through its midst, and a cottage half hidden at the end.
We have been brought up in poor cottages and have been reared on oat-cake, and lived coarse; and we haven't been to school much, nor read books, and we don't know much about anything but what happens just round us.
Betts in the cottage with the wistaria next the blacksmith's?
These cottages had one wall in common, shared in a line of iron railing dividing their front gar- dens; a wooden fence separated their back gardens.
When he dropped into the hollow, however, the impression was lost; the rocky banks, though hardly above the height of a cottage, hung over and had the profile of a precipice.
Life in cottages might be happier than ours, if they were real houses fit for human beings from whom we expect duties and affections.
Slowly they walked along the path toward the nearest cottage, the piglets racing and gambolling beside them and Jim pausing at every step for another mouthful of grass.
The huts, the neater cottages, and stately houses engaged my admiration by turns.
To these succeeded pert cottages, two and two with plots of ground in front, laid out in angular beds with stiff box borders and narrow paths between, where footstep never strayed to make the gravel rough.
There was once a tired and rather poverty- stricken Princess who dwelt in a cottage on the great highway between two cities.
Their road to this detached cottage was down Vicarage Lane, a lane leading at right angles from the broad, though irregular, main street of the place; and, as may be inferred, containing the blessed abode of Mr.