conviction

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Conviction

The outcome of a criminal prosecution which concludes in a judgment that the defendant is guilty of the crime charged. The juncture of a criminal proceeding during which the question of guilt is ascertained. In a case where the perpetrator has been adjudged guilty and sentenced, a record of the summary proceedings brought pursuant to any penal statute before one or more justices of the peace or other properly authorized persons.

The terms conviction and convicted refer to the final judgment on a verdict of guilty, a plea of guilty, or a plea of nolo contendere. They do not include a final judgment that has been deleted by a pardon, set aside, reversed, or otherwise rendered inoperative.

The term summary conviction refers to the consequence of a trial before a court or magistrate, without a jury, which generally involves a minor misdemeanor.

conviction

n. the result of a criminal trial in which the defendant has been found guilty of a crime.

conviction

(Finding of guilt), noun adjudgment, aspersion, avengement, blame, censure, charge, condemnation, criminality, culpability, damnatio, damnation, decision, decree, decrial, denouncement, denunciation, exaction of penalty, execution of sentence, final condemnation, finding, hostile verdict, imposition, judgment, passing judgment, penalization, penalty, prescribed punishhent, proof of guilt, punishment, punition, reprehension, reprisal, reprobation, reproof, retribution, retributive justice, ruling, sentence, sentencing, unfavorable verdict, verdict
Associated concepts: certificate of conviction, criminal conniction, felony conviction, final conviction, guilty verdict, nolo cotendere plea, record of conviction, sentencing

conviction

(Persuasion), noun ascertained principle, assumption, assurance, assured belief, attitude, avowal, certitude, concept, conception, conclusion, credence, creed, declaration of faith, doctrine, dogma, faith, firm belief, fixed opinion, impression, judgment, leaning, mind, opinio, opinion, outlook, personal judgment, point of view, position, positiveness, postulation, posture, predilection, predisposition, presupposition, principle, proclivity, profession, propensity, rooted belief, sententia, sentiment, settled belief, settled judgment, standpoint, staunch belief, supposition, sureness, tenet, thinking, understanding, unshakable opinion, view, viewpoint, way of thinking, well-founded opinion
See also: belief, certainty, certification, certitude, condemnation, confidence, credence, determination, dogma, faith, idea, notion, opinion, principle, punishment, reliance, sentence, standpoint, surety, trust

conviction

a person is convicted of an offence if he pleads or is found guilty of that offence.

CONVICTION, practice. A condemnation. In its most extensive sense this word signifies the giving judgment against a defendant, whether criminal or civil. In a more limited sense, it means, the judgment given against the criminal. And in its most restricted sense it is a record of the summary proceedings upon any penal statute before one or more justices of the peace, or other persons duly authorized, in a case where the offender has been convicted and sentenced: this last is usually termed a summary conviction.
     2. As summary. convictions have been introduced in derogation of the common law, and operate to the exclusion of trial by jury, the courts have required that the strict letter of the statute should be observed 1 Burr. Rep. 613 and that the magistrates should have been guided by rules similar to those adopted by the common law, in criminal prosecution, and founded in natural justice; unless when the statute dispenses with the form of stating them.
     3. The general rules in relation to convictions are, first, it must be under the hand and seal of the magistrate before whom it is taken; secondly, it must be in the present tense, but this, perhaps, ought to extend only to the judgment; thirdly, it must be certain; fourthly, although it is well to lay the offence to be contra pacem, this is not indispensable; fifthly, a conviction cannot be good in part and bad in part.
     4. A conviction usually consists of six parts; first, the information; which should contain, 1. The day when it was taken. 2. The place where it was taken. 3. The name of the informer. 4. The name and style of the justice or justices to whom it was given. 5. The name of the offender. 6. The time of committing the offence. 7. The place where the offence was committed. 8. An exact description of the offence.
     5. Secondly, the summons.
     6. Thirdly, the appearance or non-appearance of the defendant.
     7. Fourthly, his defence or confessions.
     8. Fifthly, the evidence. Dougl. 469; 2 Burr. 1163; 4 Burr. 2064.
     9. Sixthly, the judgment or adjudication, which should state, 1. That the defendant is convicted. 2. The forfeiture or penalty. Vide Bosc. on Conviction; Espinasse on Penal Actions; 4 Dall. 266; 3 Yeates, 475; 1 Yeates, 471. As to the effect of a conviction as evidence in a civil case, see 1 Phil. Ev. 259; 8 Bouv. Inst. 3183.

References in periodicals archive ?
The highly significant ministerial inquiry will look at the legal test currently used by the Court of Appeal to quash criminal convictions.
And she said another worker, with a criminal conviction, still works at the hospital and this information was ignored at her trust appeal hearing.
SOCIAL workers who took a boy of nine from his family handed him over to foster parents with criminal convictions.
A person applying to work with children or in the Garda will be required to reveal any criminal conviction.
Their spokesman said: "A person with a criminal conviction would be required to write to us and request a visa.
Criminal conviction costs will be imposed at the time of sentencing.
Fourteen states and about 100 local governments have worked to minimise job discrimination by barring public and, in many cases, private employers from asking about criminal convictions until later, when the person has had a chance to prove his or her worthiness for the job.
It also provides statewide criminal conviction information from the Department of Corrections and gives qualified individuals access to online driving record information from Oregon's Division of Motor Vehicles.
Nursing home administrators may have a first-hand look at the criminal conviction records of millions of Americans, if Congress takes action on a national job applicant screening hotline now under consideration.
Both measures require the government to obtain a criminal conviction before seizing property and to direct forfeiture revenue to programs other than law enforcement (drug treatment in Oregon, schools in Utah).
In the new study, a stressful task induced sharper heart-rate hikes in male psychopaths who had eluded criminal conviction than in their previously convicted counterparts or in nonpsychopathic men, reports a team of psychologists led by Sharon S.
Although he had done nothing wrong the matter still appears on his record as a criminal conviction.