criminal

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Related to Criminals: crime, thuggery, Illegal activities, Criminal activity, Serial killers

Criminal

Pertaining to, or involving, crimes or the administration of penal justice. An individual who has been found guilty of the commission of conduct that causes social harm and that is punishable by law; a person who has committed a crime.

criminal

1) n. a popular term for anyone who has committed a crime, whether convicted of the offense or not. More properly it should apply only to those actually convicted of a crime. Repeat offenders are sometimes called habitual criminals. 2) adj. certain acts or people involved in or relating to a crime. Examples of uses include "criminal taking," "criminal conspiracy," a "criminal gang." (See: convict, felon, habitual criminal)

criminal

noun bandit, blackguard, buccaneer, convict, defrauder, evildoer, extortionist, felon, filcher, fugitive, gangster, grafter, guilty person, gunman, hardened offender, juvenile delinquent, kidnapper, killer, knave, malefactor, malfeasant, manslayer, marauder, murderer, offender, outlaw, pilferer, pillager, pirate, plunderer, public enemy, recidivist, recreant, reus, robber, sceleratus, smuggler, sneak thief, swindler, terrorist, thief, transgressor, underworld character, villain, worker of iniquity, wrongdoer
Associated concepts: convicted criminal, criminal action, criminal attempt, criminal capacity, criminal case or cause, criminal charge, criminal code, criminal conduct, criminal conspiracy, criminal contempt, criminal conviction, criminal courts, criminal information, criminal intent, criminal judggents, criminal jurisdiction, criminal motive, criminal negliience, criminal offense, criminal procedure, criminal process, criminal prosecution, criminal responsibility, crimmnal sanctions, criminal solicitation, criminal statute, criminal syndicalism, criminal transaction, criminal trial, habitual criminal, known criminals
Foreign phrases: Frustra legis auxilium invocat qui in legem committit.He vainly seeks the aid of the law who transgresses the law.
See also: aggressor, assailant, blameful, blameworthy, burglar, convict, culpable, delinquent, embezzler, felon, felonious, guilty, hoodlum, illegal, illegitimate, illicit, immoral, impermissible, improper, iniquitous, irregular, larcenous, lawbreaker, lawless, malefactor, nefarious, offender, outlaw, peccant, prisoner, racketeer, recidivist, reprehensible, reprobate, tainted, thief, unconscionable, unlawful, vandal, vicious, wrongdoer, wrongful

criminal

1 a person convicted of CRIME.
2 of, involving, or guilty of CRIME.

CRIMINAL. Relating to, or having the character of crime; as, criminal law, criminal conversation, &c. It also signifies a person convicted of a crime.

LAW, CRIMINAL. By criminal law is understood that system of laws which provides for the mode of trial of persons charged with criminal offences, defines crimes, and provides for their punishments.

References in classic literature ?
Then I made inquiries as to this mysterious assistant and found that I had to deal with one of the coolest and most daring criminals in London.
A criminal strain ran in his blood, which, instead of being modified, was increased and rendered infinitely more dangerous by his extraordinary mental powers.
How strange that criminals seldom swoon at such a moment
By my first ancestor if it is not one of their great chiefs," he said, "and we were told that slaves and criminals were to play for the stake of this game.
Go to your club, and look at the criminal history of our own time, recorded in the newspapers.
That there are foolish criminals who are discovered, and wise criminals who escape.
Jonathan Wild was the hidden force of the London criminals, to whom he sold his brains and his organization on a fifteen per cent.
But on one side of the portal, and rooted almost at the threshold, was a wild rose-hush, covered, in this month of June, with its delicate gems, which might be imagined to offer their fragrance and fragile beauty to the prisoner as he went in, and to the condemned criminal as he came forth to his doom, in token that the deep heart of Nature could pity and be kind to him.
Perhaps when I am dead the society will see the criminal selfishness of reserving for itself what was meant for mankind.
He then takes the criminal into custody till he hath made satisfaction; but if it be a crime punishable with death he is delivered over to the prosecutor, who may put him to death at his own discretion.
The mere silence of the Constitution in regard to civil causes, is represented as an abolition of the trial by jury, and the declamations to which it has afforded a pretext are artfully calculated to induce a persuasion that this pretended abolition is complete and universal, extending not only to every species of civil, but even to criminal causes.
Owing to occasional retrogressions, to still more frequent moral and intellectual stagnation, and to the extraordinary fecundity of the Criminal and Vagabond Classes, there is always a vast superfluity of individuals of the half degree and single degree class, and a fair abundance of Specimens up to 10 degrees.