customer

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customer

noun acceptor, bargainer, bidder, business contact, buyer, buyer of labor, client, consumer, emptor, leaser, lessee, one of the clientele, one of the purrhasing public, patron, prospect, purchaser, purchaser of goods from another, redeemer, share buyer, shopper, taker, user, vendee
Associated concepts: buyer in the ordinary course of business, cash customer, customer in ordinary course of business, duty to customers, interference with customers, loss of customers, occasional customer, solicitation of customers
See also: client, consumer, patron
References in classic literature ?
Bobbinet, when his customers were properly out of hearing, "that THESE young ladies should let such an article slip through their fingers.
The shop was crammed with customers, and there were crowds of mice upon the biscuit canisters.
This little bell,--to speak in plainer terms, --being fastened over the shop-door, was so contrived as to vibrate by means of a steel spring, and thus convey notice to the inner regions of the house when any customer should cross the threshold.
Unfortunately, everything had included the customers.
It was hopelessly cracked; but of an evening, at the slightest provocation, it clattered behind the customer with impudent virulence.
It soon became known that Jerry had lost his best customer, and for what reason.
I plucked up courage at once, crossed the threshold, and walked right up to the man where he stood, propped on his crutch, talking to a customer.
For, it would seem that Purl must always be taken early; though whether for any more distinctly stomachic reason than that, as the early bird catches the worm, so the early purl catches the customer, cannot here be resolved.
I have passed from one to another, in the course of my business life, just as I pass from one of our customers to another in the course of my business day; in short, I have no feelings; I am a mere machine.
The sturdy landlord had a large pair of dull fish-like eyes, and the little man who had hazarded the remark about the moon (and who was the parish-clerk and bell-ringer of Chigwell, a village hard by) had little round black shiny eyes like beads; moreover this little man wore at the knees of his rusty black breeches, and on his rusty black coat, and all down his long flapped waistcoat, little queer buttons like nothing except his eyes; but so like them, that as they twinkled and glistened in the light of the fire, which shone too in his bright shoe-buckles, he seemed all eyes from head to foot, and to be gazing with every one of them at the unknown customer.
She was sitting quite still, for the stream of customers had lessened at this late hour in the afternoon; the gentlemen had chiefly chosen the middle of the day, and Maggie's stall was looking rather bare.
As he got up meekly, the other reflected that he had always been a steady man, and might soon be a good customer again.