Damnum


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Damnum

[Latin, Damage.] The loss or reduction in the value of property, life, or health of an individual as a consequence of Fraud, carelessness, or accident.

The phrase ad damnum, "to the damage," is the name of a clause in a complaint that states the damages for which the individual seeks judicial relief.

See: detriment, harm, injury, loss, mischief
References in periodicals archive ?
included under the damnum emergens can be divided into inflation and
and gas are damnum absque injuria by analogy to earlier cases dealing
16) In addition to readability, however, we were able to generate data on five common measures of plain legal English: (1) stuffy terms that often have plainer counterparts, like "abutting," "commence," "multitudinous," and "necessitous"; (2) compound constructions that usually can be expressed in a plainer way, like "during the period from," "with regard to," "because of the fact that"; (3) redundant legal phrases like "false and untrue," "aid and abet," and "give, devise and bequeath"; (4) "lawyerisms" like "hereby," "aforesaid," and "wherein"; and (5) Latinisms like "id est," "ad quod damnum," and "de lege lata".
MARK KANTOR, VALUATION FOR ARBITRATION: COMPENSATION STANDARDS, VALUATION METHODS AND EXPERT EVIDENCE 8-17 (2008) (describing basic approaches to valuation); SERGEY RIPINSKY, DAMAGES IN INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT LAW (2008); Sergey Ripinsky, Damnum Emergens and Lucrum Cessans, in INVESTMENT TREATY LAW: CURRENT ISSUES III 45, 45-58 (Andrea K.
Sed in rebuspublicis, imo et aequitate duce ita restricta est haec licentia, ut laesus aestimatione debeat esse contentus, reservata Reipublicae poena si damnum consulto datum est.
capturable expectations, the regulation of which is damnum absque
4 No ATLA member shall personally, or through an associate attorney, file a complaint with a specific ad damnum amount unless required by local rules of court.
Dedge consider the old legal maxim damnum absque injuria.
26) The first is damnum emergens, that is, compensation for actual losses suffered.
This is what lawyers call a damnum absque injuria, a "[l]oss, hurt, or harm without injury in the legal sense, that is, without such breach of duty as is redressible by an action.