Defloration


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DEFLORATION. The act by which a woman is deprived of her virginity.
     2. When this is done unlawfully, and against her will, it bears the name of rape, (q.v.) when she consents, it is fornication. (q.v.)

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5 Preston, in the preface to the concordance, notes a related pattern in which Fanny uses the phrase "stopping my mouth with kisses" in reference to Charles at two crucial moments (42, 178), the moment of defloration and the moment of reunion.
Des lors que la victime de l'abus sexuel est un(e) mineur(e), le legislateur tend a alourdir les peines qui vont de 2 a 30 ans de prison, selon la nature de l'acte, c'est-a-dire s'il s'agit d'un attentat a la pudeur avec ou sans violence ou d'un viol, et en prenant en consideration les facteurs d'aggravation relatifs notamment aux consequences physiques de l'agression (s'il y a eu defloration ou pas), au statut socioprofessionnel de l'agresseur et aux liens de parente ou autres, qu'il entretient avec la victime", precise-t-il.
As for Bottom's curious dismay over the defloration of his dear (a dismay expressed, one might also note, as he holds aloft her bloodied mantle [V.
in order to suggest the deeply injurious nature of Liz's defloration subliminally the story is shot through with a number of natural objects and activities that all involve painful, hurting penetration.
Instead of performing a marriage ritual for defloration I found it more honest to do it like this.
Further upriver, at Longwuk, the men I questioned favoured the existence of an ancient rite of defloration performed on the newly menstruated girl.
As read with professional decorum by the author, a former editor of The New York Times Magazine, it tells us of Jackie's defloration in a Paris elevator, Jack's well-publicized liaison with Marilyn Monroe, and both Jack and Jackie shooting speed in the White House, among other indiscretions.
exemplifies Part 1 of Davis's narrative in that it reads a passage from Tennyson's Idylls of the King as a nineteenth-century transformation of the traditional "Virgin Tale" into a story that refuses the closure of either marriage or defloration by rape or seduction.
Markers of illicit sexual behavior in women were few: essentially either proof of defloration or proof of a pregnancy.
30) Nowhere else, however, is defloration regarded as a polluting offense, virginal blood or no, and Enlil's omission could easily have been cured by an order of the court to marry Ninlil.