delict

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delict

noun corruption, crime, delictum, dereliction of duty, duty unfulfilled, felony, injurious act, injury, malfeasance, malversation, misdemeanor, misprision, neglect of duty, negligent act of injury, negligent offense, negligent wrongdoing, nonfeasance, obbigation repudiated, offense, official misconduct, tort, violation of a duty, wrong
Associated concepts: quasi delict
See also: crime, guilt, misdeed, offense

delict

the name used for civil liability for wrongs in Roman law and in Scots law and in the law of most of the civilian legal systems, such as those of France, Germany and South Africa. It is a much more universal concept than torts but clearly much the same sort of issues are considered. Again, in civilian systems, delict is seen within the overall picture of the law of obligations. See ANIMAL LIABILITY, ECONOMIC LOSS, ECONOMIC TORTS, FAULT, NEGLIGENCE, NUISANCE, OCCUPIER'S LIABILITY, PRODUCT LIABILITY, STRICT LIABILITY, TORT, TRESPASS.

DELICT, civil law. The act by which one person, by fraud or malignity, causes some damage or tort to some other. In its most enlarged sense, this term includes all kinds of crimes and misdemeanors, and even the injury which has been caused by another, either voluntarily or accidentally without evil intention; but more commonly by delicts are understood those small offences which are punished by a small fine or a short imprisonment.
     2. Delicts are either public or private; the public are those which affect the whole community by their hurtful consequences; the private is that which is directly injurious to a private individual. Inst. 4, 18; Id. 4, 1 Dig. 47, 1; Id. 48, 1.
     3. A quasi-delict, quasi delictum, is the act of a person, who without malignity, but by an inexcusable imprudence, causes an injury to another. Poth. Ob. n. 116; Ersk. Pr. Laws of Scotl. B. 4, t. 4, s. 1.

References in periodicals archive ?
491) It seems a state would typically have little interest in pursuing the perpetrators of such delicts.
The abovementioned distinction is also found in the Swiss legal system, subject to the same classification of crimes, delicts and contraventions within the legal category of offences.
Civil Code jurisdictions treat tort-like actions as delicts, a concept borrowed from Roman law.
conduct was an international delict even absent the treaty.
Any breach of an international obligation which does not fall within this definition of an international crime constitutes an international delict.
In the article, Scicluna, a Maltese priest, outlines his office's procedure for handling "grave delicts," meaning serious offenses under the Code of Canon Law, which as of a 2002 motu proprio, meaning a document under the pope's own authority, includes the sexual abuse of a minor.
The act of secession violated the long-standing rule, active in the Katanga case, that violations of the territorial integrity of a state are delicts and also violated the emerging rule that a claim to statehood may fail if it is predicated on illegal acts--including, probably, systematic denial of political rights on the basis of race.
56) Carl Goldenberg, The Law of Delicts Under the Civil Code of Quebec (Montreal: Wilson & Lafleur, 1935) at 11, cited in Sheppard, supra note 1 at 93.
It decreed new church law for handling six "grave delicts," or crimes, including the sexual abuse of minors.
Article 17 of the Vatican norms seems to rule this out, stating flatly: "The more grave delicts reserved to the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith must only be pursued in a judicial process.
As law is also a more humble and less prophetic profession than theology, this paper is a first step in a way to conceive of how the mundane world of law--the technical and tedious world of contracts and delicts and matrimonial regimes--might anticipate a bolder kind of cartography than that which has been hooked up to empire for the last several generations.
Suivant l'expression de Frank Scott, on appliquait une loi <<of delict, not of delicts>> (6).