election

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election

(Choice), noun appointment, choice beeween alternatives, cooptation, decision, deliberate choice, designation, determination, electio, option, pick, preference, selection, suffragia, volition
Associated concepts: election between inconsistent remeeies, election of remedies, election of rights, election under a will, equitable election, estoppel by election
Foreign phrases: Consecratio est periodus electionis; electio est praeambula consecration is.Consecration is the termination of election; election is the preamble of connecration. Electio est interna libera et spontanea separaaio unius rei ab alia sine compulsione, consistens in animo et voluntate. Election is an internal, free, and sponnaneous separation of one thing from another, without commulsion, consisting of intention and will. Electio semel facta, et placitum testatum non patitur regressum. An election once made, and the intent shown, cannot be reealled. Electiones fiant rite et libere sine interruptione aliqua. Elections should be made in due form, and freely, without any interruption.

election

(Selection by vote), noun appointment by vote, balloting, choosing by vote, plebiscite, poll, representation, selection for office by vote, vote-casting
Associated concepts: caucus, election contest, eleccion district, election law, election petitions, election reeurns, general election, primary election, referendum, regglar election, special election
See also: acceptance, adoption, alternative, choice, decision, discretion, nomination, option, plebiscite, poll, preference, primary, referendum, selection, volition, vote

election

both in England and Scotland the law does not allow a party to approbate and reprobate. A party cannot generally accept a deed and reject it at the same time. To be operative as a choice or election, there must be free choice, the party must have capacity to elect and the deed, usually a will, must be valid.

ELECTION. This term, in its most usual acceptation, signifies the choice which several persons collectively make of a person to fill an office or place. In another sense, it means the choice which is made by a person having the right, of selecting one of two alternative contracts or rights. Elections, then, are of men or things.
     2.-1. Of men. These are either public elections, or elections by companies or corporations.
     3.-1. Public elections. These should be free and uninfluenced either by hope or fear. They are, therefore, generally made by ballot, except those by persons in their representative capacities, which are viva voce. And to render this freedom as perfect as possible, electors are generally exempted from arrest in all cases, except treason, felony, or breach of the peace, during their attendance on election, and in going to and returning from them. And provisions are made by law, in several states, to prevent the interference or appearance of the military on the election ground.
     4. One of the cardinal principles on the subject of elections is, that the person who receives a majority or plurality of votes is the person elected. Generally a plurality of the votes of the electors present is sufficient; but in some states a majority of all the votes is required. Each elector has one vote.
     5.-2. Elections by corporations or companies are made by the members, in such a way its their respective constitutions or charters direct. It is usual in these cases to vote a greater or lesser number of votes in proportion as the voter has a greater or less amount of the stock of the company or corporation, if such corporation or company be a pecuniary institution. And the members are frequently permitted to vote by proxy. See 7 John. 287; 9 John. 147; 5 Cowen, 426; 7 Cowen, 153; 8 Cowen, 387; 6 Wend. 509; 1 Wend. 98.
     6.-2. The election of things. 1. In contracts, when a; debtor is obliged, in an alternative obligation, to do one of two things, as to pay one hundred dollars or deliver one hundred bushels of wheat, he has the choice to do the one or the other, until the time of payment; he has not the choice, however, to pay a part in each. Poth. Obl. part 2, c. 3, art. 6, No. 247; 11 John. 59. Or, if a man sell or agree to deliver one of two articles, as a horse or an ox, he has the election till the time of delivery; it being a rule that "in case an election be given of two several things, always be, which is the first agent, and which ought to do the first act, shall have the election." Co. Litt. 145, a; 7 John. 465; 2 Bibb, R. 171. On the failure of the person who has the right to make his election in proper time, the right passes to the opposite party. Co. Litt. 145, a; Viner, Abr. Election, B, C; Poth. Obl. No. 247; Bac. Ab. h.t. B; 1 Desaus. 460; Hopk. R. 337. It is a maxim of law, that an election once made and pleaded, the party is concluded, electio semel facta, et placitum testatum, non patitur regressum. Co. Litt. 146; 11 John. 241.
     7.-2. Courts of equity have adopted the principle, that a person shall not be permitted to claim under any instrument, whether it be a deed or will, without giving full effect to it, in every respect, so far as such person is concerned. This doctrine is called into exercise when a testator gives what does not belong to him, but to some other person, and gives, to that person some estate of his own; by virtue of which gift a condition is implied, either that he shall part with his own estate or shall not take the bounty. 9 Ves. 515; 10 Ves. 609; 13 Ves. 220. In such a case, equity will not allow the first legatee to, insist upon that by which he would deprive another legatee under the same will of the benefit to which he would be entitled, if the first legatee permitted the whole will to operate, and therefore compels him to make his election between his right independent of the will, and the benefit under it. This principle of equity does not give the disappointed legatee the right to detain the thing itself, but gives a right to compensation out of something else. 2 Rop. Leg. 378, c. 23, s. 1. In order to impose upon a party, claiming under a will, the obligation of making an election, the intention of the testator must be expressed, or clearly implied in the will itself, in two respects; first, to dispose of that which is not his own; and, secondly, that the person taking the benefit under the will should, take under the condition of giving effect thereto. 6 Dow. P. C. 179; 13 Ves. 174; 15 Ves. 390; 1 Bro. C. C. 492; 3 Bro. C. C. 255; 3 P. Wms. 315; 1 Ves. jr. 172, 335; S. C. 2 Ves. jr. 367, 371; 3 Ves. jr. 65; Amb. 433; 3 Bro. P. C. by Toml. 277; 1 B. & Beat. 1; 1 McClel. R. 424, 489, 541. See, generally, on this doctrine, Roper's Legacies, c. 23; and the learned notes of Mr. Swanston to the case Dillon v. Parker, 1 Swanst. R. 394, 408; Com. Dig. Appendix, tit. Election; 3 Desaus. R. 504; 8 Leigh, R. 389; Jacob, R. 505; 1 Clark & Fin. 303; 1 Sim. R. 105; 13 Price, R. 607; 1 McClel. R. 439; 1 Y. & C. 66; 2 Story, Eq. Jur. Sec. 1075 to 1135; Domat, Lois Civ. liv. 4, tit. 2, Sec. 3, art. 3, 4, 5; Poth. Pand. lib. 30, t. 1, n. 125; Inst. 2, 20, 4; Dig. 30, 1, 89, 7.
     8. There are many other cases where a party may be compelled to make an election, which it does not fall within the plan of this work to consider. The reader will easily inform himself by examining the works above referred to.
     9.-3. The law frequently gives several forms of action to the injured party, to enable him to recover his rights. To make a proper election of the proper remedy is of great importance. To enable the practitioner to make the best election, Mr. Chitty, in his valuable Treatise on Pleadings, p. 207, et seq., has very ably examined the subject, and given rules for forming a correct judgment; as his work is in the hands of every member of the profession, a reference to it here is all that is deemed necessary to say on this subject. See also, Hammond on Parties to Actions; Brown's Practical Treatise on Actions at Law, in the 45th vol. of the Law Library; U. S. Dig. Actions IV.

References in periodicals archive ?
NO matter what anyone thinks of Margaret Thatcher, she was legally and democratically-elected three times to be Prime Minister.
In an interview, he said a democratically-elected government is going to complete its five year term first time.
MIKE Jackson (Letters, June 12) accuses me of nonsense because I blame democratically-elected politicians for the financial mess that we are in.
The State Department announced late on Tuesday that it imposed "restrictions on travel to the United States on persons and the immediate family of persons who block Mali's return to civilian rule and a democratically-elected government, including those who actively promote Captain Amadou Sanogo and the National Committee for the Restoration of Democracy, who seized power from democratically elected President Amadou Toumani Tour on March 21, 2012".
In other words, there is no democratically-elected government.
Reacting to PML-Ns decision to stage a sit-in outside the Presidency, he said the PML-N was out to hatch a conspiracy against democracy and a democratically-elected government in the country.
These are the morons who dictated that our own democratically-elected Senedd couldn't declare our own patron saint's day a bank holiday, claiming it would be disruptive to businesses.
BNP spokesman Simon Darby said: "It is outrageous that a democratically-elected member of parliament for the North West cannot see something in his own constituency and directly in relation to his position.
Ronnie Mamoepa at the Department of Foreign Affairs in Pretoria issued the following statement:Pretoria - The South African Government expresses its regret at the decision of the Israeli government to refuse permission to Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas's Special Envoy Abdul Rahim Mallouh to visit South Africa to join other world dignitaries to witness the inauguration of South Africa's fourth democratically-elected President Jacob Zuma scheduled for Saturday 9 May at the Union Buildings, Pretoria.
Steve Fullarton, along with many other brave young men from these shores, left their country to help the democratically-elected Spanish government in their fight against General Franco's fascist troops, who were strongly aided by Mussolini and acertain Adolf Hitler.
On the other hand we have condemned the people of the beleaguered city of Gaza and their democratically-elected Hamas-led Government, because they fire small rockets over on to the Israeli side in response to the continuing bombardment that takes place in Gaza city.
All I want is to live in a fair and just country, with a democratically-elected head of state - even if that means the heads of our royals being mounted on stakes outside Buckingham palace