destination

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destination

noun aim, aspiration, bourn, consummation, debarkation point, destiny, end, end result, ending, finish, goal, intent, intention, journey's end, last stop, object, objective, planned place of arrival, point of cessation, point of disembarkation, port, purpose, resting place, result, stop, stopping-place, target, terminal, termiial point, termination, terminus
Associated concepts: destination contracts, final destination, place of destination, point of destination
See also: design, end, goal, intent, intention, object, objective, purpose, pursuit, target, termination

destination

in Scots succession law, a clause that states to whom certain property is to transmit after the first intended recipient. See SPECIAL DESTINATION.

DESTINATION. The application which the testator directs shall be made of the legacy he gives; for example, when a testator gives to a hospital a sum of money, to be applied in erecting buildings, he is said to give a destination to the legacy. Destination also signifies the intended application of a thing. Mill stones, for example, taken out of a mill to be picked, and to be returned, have a destination, and are considered as real estate, although detached from the freehold. Heir looms, (q.v.) although personal chattels, are, by their destination, considered real estate and money agreed or directed to be laid out in land, is treated as real property. Newl. on Contr. ch. 8; Fonbl. Eq. B. 1, c. 6, Sec. 9; 3 Wheat. R. 577; 2 Bell's Com. 2; Ersk. Inst. 2 Sec. 14. Vide Mill.
     2. When the owner of two adjoining houses uses, during his life, the property in such a manner as to make one property subject to the other, and devises one property to one person, and the other to another, this is said not to be an easement or servitude, but a destination by the former owner. Lois des Bat. partie 1, c. 4, art. 3, Sec. 3; 5 Har. & John. 82. See Dedication.

DESTINATION, com. law. The port at which a ship is to end her voyage is called her port of destination. Pard. n. 600.

References in classic literature ?
Should he reach destination methinks I shall have rendered some service to Your Excellency, as from many parts I am urged to send him off, so as to dispel the loathing and disgust caused by another Don Quixote who, under the name of Second Part, has run masquerading through the whole world.
He had half expected to find the girl at the destination of the two riders and had been disappointed when no sign of her materialized about the camp.
He called a railway porter, and bade him carry the portmanteau to the cloak-room: not that he had any notion of delay; flight, instant flight was his design, no matter whither; but he had determined to dismiss the cabman ere he named, or even chose, his destination, thus possibly balking the Judicial Error of another link.
The Abraham Lincoln had been well chosen and equipped for her new destination.
He never took one step too many, and always went to his destination by the shortest cut; he made no superfluous gestures, and was never seen to be moved or agitated.
As I assumed the clothes, I began asking him some questions about the destination of the ship.
But the reason why he wants sometimes to go off at a tangent may just be that he is predestined to make the road, and perhaps, too, that however stupid the "direct" practical man may be, the thought sometimes will occur to him that the road almost always does lead somewhere, and that the destination it leads to is less important than the process of making it, and that the chief thing is to save the well-conducted child from despising engineering, and so giving way to the fatal idleness, which, as we all know, is the mother of all the vices.
The stronger men will be in front, the jaded ones will fall behind, and on this plan only one-tenth of your army will reach its destination.
Evidently he was reluctant to take his final cross- bearings of this earth for a Departure on the only voyage to an unknown destination a sailor ever undertakes.
The expedition for the occupation of the Marquesas had sailed from Brest in the spring of 1842, and the secret of its destination was solely in the possession of its commander.
They were the preliminaries of the general removal, the passing of the empty waggons and teams to fetch the goods of the migrating families; for it was always by the vehicle of the farmer who required his services that the hired man was conveyed to his destination.
Amid the angry shouting of thern guardsmen we rose high above the last fortress of the Holy Therns, and then raced straight toward the northeast and Kaol, the destination which I had heard from the lips of Matai Shang.