detainee

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in section 1005 of the Detainee Treatment Act of 2005, no court,
federal laws that the Constitution Project's blue ribbon Task Force on Detainee Treatment report finds that top officials of the Bush administration, and President Push himself, were responsible for the degrading treatment of detainees after 9/11 attacks and highlights the vitality of the appointment of a "Truth Commission" to investigate and bring those responsible before justice.
section addresses detainee treatment standards during interrogations,
8) A majority of scholars who have addressed the issue of torture under American domestic law appear to concur, restricting themselves to analyses of whether particular techniques qualify as torture under the laws as currently drafted, rather than suggesting that the laws themselves should be revised to clarify which specific forms of detainee treatment are illegal and which are not.
As in detentions during armed conflict, the Detainee Treatment Act of 2005 applies on warships during non-armed conflict situations.
89) Treatment of wartime detainees in the conflict with al Qaeda and the Taliban is primarily governed by the Detainee Treatment Act of 2005 and Common Article 3 of the Geneva Conventions.
In December 2005, Congress passed the Detainee Treatment Act of 2005 (DTA).
466 (2004), superseded by statute, Detainee Treatment Act of 2005, Pub.
81) Although the rules governing detainee treatment have changed significantly in the years since this manual was written, a system of rewards and consequences to incentivize good detainee behavior is still in effect.
Our field detention sites are all consistent with international and US law and policy, including Common Article III of the Geneva Conventions, the Detainee Treatment Act, the (Defense Department) Detainee Directive and the Army Field Manual," she said.
67) It held that the Detainee Treatment Act (DTA) (68) procedures under which the accused was being tried, and pursuant to which the court reviews the legality of standards and procedures of Combatant Status Review Tribunal determinations, was "an inadequate substitute for habeas corpus.