devolution

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devolution

n. the transfer of rights, powers, or an office (public or private) from one person or government to another. (See: devolve)

devolution

noun assignment, bequeathal, bequest, change of hands, conveyance, delegation, delegation of duties, deliverance, delivery, demise, devise, interchange, nonretention, reversion, substitution, succession, succession of property rights, transfer, transfer of property, transference, transmission
Associated concepts: devolution of liability, devolution of property
See also: assignment, conveyance, delegation, deputation, succession

devolution

1 the transmission ofan interest in property from one person to another by operation of law.
2 in constitutional law, the giving of a degree of power, functional, sectional or geographic, to an inferior body. A recent legal model appeared in the Scotland Act 1998.

DEVOLUTION, eccl. law. The transfer, by forfeiture, of a right and power which a person has to another, on account of some act or negligence of the person who is vested with such right or power: for example, when a person has the right of preseptation, and he does not present within the time prescribed, the right devolves on his next immediate superior. Ayl. Par. 331.

References in periodicals archive ?
We were unable to contact Coun Henig to explain more fully what level of devolved powers they would have to be promised before agreeing to have an elected Mayor with responsibility for the whole of the region.
It will now be for the UK Government to respond positively to our suggested amendments to move negotiations forward, and ensure there is a functioning legal system on withdrawal from the EU, and agreed UK structures - where these are required - that reflect the views and interests of all parts of the UK, and respect devolved powers and responsibilities.
Our elected local authority representatives have yet to take the deal offered and, if the delays in reaching agreement continue, the real threat to our region's wellbeing is not having devolved powers at all rather than whether we have an elected mayor to bang the drum for us all in the wider world.
It is to the Labour council leaders' credit that they have overcome any party political objections to consider an elected mayor who will be responsible for the devolved powers.
The Chancellor pledged to give regional cities similar devolved powers as Manchester.
Ahead of his appearance at the British Chambers of Commerce annual conference, the Deputy First Minister said: This Government is enthusiastic in our support for business and that is why it is good for the economy to increase the devolved powers of the Parliament and to allow us to provide a local, Scottish-specific approach to help generate growth, secure a better economic position and attract higher levels of investment.
In order to establish a baseline for public opinion in favour of further devolved powers, I suggest that the All Wales Convention, led by Sir Emyr Jones Parry, communicate with previously supportive devolutionists who have lived in North East Wales all of their lives before setting out on a route of great optimism for the WAG to act upon.
THE Government was today facing a parliamentary battle with Ulster Unionists as it rushes through the Northern Ireland Bill handing devolved powers to a power-sharing executive in Ulster within the week.
While progress was made on devolved powers for the Scottish party, the key item at yesterday's NEC talks - Labour MPs' power struggle with Jeremy Corbyn- remained deadlocked.
All present unanimously and harmoniously agreed on how important it is to the people of the North east that we secure devolved powers to our region as fast as we are able to.
It calls on the Welsh Government to make the best use of its devolved powers.
We are already two thirds of the way there with the devolved powers given to all of the countries within the UK apart from England.