Dewey Decimal System


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Dewey Decimal System: Melvil Dewey

Dewey Decimal System

A numerical classification system of books employed by libraries.

The Dewey Decimal System, created by Melvil Dewey, is a reference system that classifies all subjects by number. The numbers in a particular grouping all refer to a designated general topic. For example, the numbers in the 340s concern topics of law. Each new number after the decimal point further subdivides the previous number and the subject it covers.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The "see" feature of the Dewey Decimal System is very important: you don't have to know how the Library of Congress named the subject.
He was responsible for introducing the Dewey decimal system of classification, firstly in the Lending Library in 1899 and then in the Reference Library over 1910-15.
As the Dewey Decimal system standardized library classification, so standards like the Dublin Core identify standard sets of keywords included with Web-based content to help people easily find content of interest.
Befitting its name, each hotel floor and room is classified by a Dewey Decimal system category of knowledge: Third floor: Social Sciences; Fourth Floor: Language; Fifth Floor: Math and Science; Sixth Floor: Technology; Seventh Floor: The Arts; Eighth Floor: Literature; Ninth Floor: History; Tenth Floor: General Knowledge; Eleventh Floor: Philosophy; and Twelfth Floor: Religion.
The public has always identified librarianship with the Dewey Decimal System and the process of cataloging, but to us, reference epitomized the profession with its pervasive service component.
Bush, it seems to me last time you were here there was a question whether or not all the books in your house were arranged according to the Dewey Decimal System.
Recommendations range in radicalness from providing a monthly book club to dispensing of the Dewey Decimal System in favor of a shelving structure more akin to bookstores.
The Dewey Decimal System was much too difficult to implement for a small library.
Important developments during gilded age America include the development of the Dewey decimal system, the founding of the American Library Association, and the establishment of a library school at Columbia University.
championships by Katharin Dewey, granddaughter of the inventor of the Dewey decimal system, who is also credited with bringing the sport to Lake Placid.
In her 13 years as a Springfield Public Library volunteer, the 82-year-old Berry has proven as reliable as the Dewey decimal system.
The Dewey Decimal System, according to which most of the public libraries in the United States are organized, is a cultural interpretation of how knowledge is interrelated (Cooper, 2004).